Support for Putin wanes in his former Russian stronghold

Support for Putin wanes in his former Russian stronghold

FILE - In this March 6, 2018, file photo, Russian President Vladimir Putin listens to employees of Uralvagonzavod factory in Nizhny Tagil, Russia. In 2011, Nizhny Tagil - an industrial city some 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow - was nicknamed “Putingrad” for its residents' fervent support of the president. Now, however, workers who once defended Putin are speaking out against the constitutional reforms that would allow him to stay in office until 2036. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko, File)
This June 6, 2020, photo shows an industrial area of Nizhny Tagil, a city 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow, Russia. In 2011, the city became known as “Putingrad” for its residents’ fervent support of Russian President Vladimir Putin. Now, however, workers who once defended Putin are speaking out against the constitutional reforms that would allow him to stay in office until 2036. (AP Photo/Anton Basanayev)
In this photo taken on Sunday, June 28, 2020, Nikolay Nemytov, a 43-year-old engineer at Russian Railways, speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in Nizhny Tagil, some 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow, Russia. Workers in the city that once was seen as a Putin stronghold are speaking out against the constitutional reforms that would allow him to stay in office until 2036 amid growing frustration over their dire living conditions that have not improved. “I am against the constitutional changes, most importantly because they are a coronation of the czar, who reigns but does not rule — Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin,” says Nemytov. He says his monthly salary, the equivalent of $430, is not nearly enough. (AP Photo/Anton Basanayev)
In this photo taken on Sunday, June 28, 2020, Nikolay Nemytov, a 43-year-old worker at Russian Railways, walks past a monument to local inventors and engineers after his interview with The Associated Press in Nizhny Tagil, Russia. Workers in the city 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow that once was seen as a Putin stronghold are speaking out against the constitutional reforms that would allow him to stay in office until 2036. They are frustrated over dire living conditions that have not improved during his tenure. “I am against the constitutional changes, most importantly because they are a coronation of the czar, who reigns but does not rule — Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin,” says Nemytov. He says his monthly salary, the equivalent of $430, is not nearly enough. (AP Photo/Anton Basanayev)
In this photo taken on Sunday, June 28, 2020, Anton Zhuravlyov, 33, an operator at the Nizhny Tagil Iron and Steel Works Plant (NTMK) speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in Nizhny Tagil, some 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow, Russia. Workers in the city 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow that once was seen as a Putin stronghold are speaking out against the constitutional reforms that would allow him to stay in office until 2036. They cite growing frustration over their dire living conditions that have not improved during his tenure. “I think (the vote) is just a show. It is more for Putin to show that, ‘Look, the people support me, I am still needed, I am in demand,’" said Zhuravlyov. (AP Photo/Anton Basanayev)
In this photo taken on Sunday, June 28, 2020, Anton Zhuravlyov, 33, an operator at the Nizhny Tagil Iron and Steel Works Plant (NTMK), is interviewed by The Associated Press in Nizhny Tagil, Russia. Workers in the city 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow that once was seen as a Putin stronghold are speaking out against the constitutional reforms that would allow him to stay in office until 2036. They cite growing frustration over their dire living conditions that have not improved during his tenure. “I think (the vote) is just a show. It is more for Putin to show that, ‘Look, the people support me, I am still needed, I am in demand,’" said Zhuravlyov. (AP Photo/Anton Basanayev)
FILE - In this May 18, 2012, file photo, Igor Kholmanskikh, a section head at the Uralvagonzavod tank factory in the Urals city of Nizhny Tagil, that builds battle tanks, meets with Russian President Vladimir Putin, in the Novo-Ogaryovo residence outside Moscow, Russia. Kholmanskih, a foreman at the state tank and railroad car factory Uralvagonzavod, appeared on Putin’s annual nationwide phone-in marathon in December 2011 and denounced the mass protests occurring in Moscow at the time as a threat to “stability." (Yana Lapikova, Sputnik/Government Pool Photo via AP, File)
In this photo taken on Sunday, June 28, 2020, Nadezhda Zhuravlyova, 36, a local activist, speaks during her interview with The Associated Press in Nizhny Tagil, some 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow, Russia. In 2011, the industrial city of Nizhny Tagil was dubbed “Putingrad” for its residents’ fervent support of Russian President Vladimir Putin. Zhuravlyova says a lot has changed since then, citing economic conditions that have not improved during Putin’s time in office. (AP Photo/Anton Basanayev)
In this photo taken on Sunday, June 28, 2020, Nadezhda Zhuravlyova, 36, a local activist, speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in Nizhny Tagil, some 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow, Russia. In 2011, the industrial city of Nizhny Tagil was dubbed “Putingrad” for its residents’ fervent support of Russian President Vladimir Putin. Zhuravlyova says a lot has changed since then, citing wages that have not kept pace with the cost of living. (AP Photo/Anton Basanayev)
This June 6, 2020, photo, shows the industrial area of Nizhny Tagil, some 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow, Russia. In 2011, the city became known as “Putingrad” for its residents’ fervent support of Russian President Vladimir Putin. Workers who once defended Putin now are speaking out against the constitutional reforms that would allow him to stay in office until 2036, saying economic conditions have worsened during his tenure. (AP Photo/Anton Basanayev)

Support for Putin wanes in his former Russian stronghold

FILE - In this March 6, 2018, file photo, Russian President Vladimir Putin listens to employees of Uralvagonzavod factory in Nizhny Tagil, Russia. In 2011, Nizhny Tagil - an industrial city some 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow - was nicknamed “Putingrad” for its residents' fervent support of the president. Now, however, workers who once defended Putin are speaking out against the constitutional reforms that would allow him to stay in office until 2036. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko, File)
This June 6, 2020, photo shows an industrial area of Nizhny Tagil, a city 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow, Russia. In 2011, the city became known as “Putingrad” for its residents’ fervent support of Russian President Vladimir Putin. Now, however, workers who once defended Putin are speaking out against the constitutional reforms that would allow him to stay in office until 2036. (AP Photo/Anton Basanayev)
In this photo taken on Sunday, June 28, 2020, Nikolay Nemytov, a 43-year-old engineer at Russian Railways, speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in Nizhny Tagil, some 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow, Russia. Workers in the city that once was seen as a Putin stronghold are speaking out against the constitutional reforms that would allow him to stay in office until 2036 amid growing frustration over their dire living conditions that have not improved. “I am against the constitutional changes, most importantly because they are a coronation of the czar, who reigns but does not rule — Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin,” says Nemytov. He says his monthly salary, the equivalent of $430, is not nearly enough. (AP Photo/Anton Basanayev)
In this photo taken on Sunday, June 28, 2020, Nikolay Nemytov, a 43-year-old worker at Russian Railways, walks past a monument to local inventors and engineers after his interview with The Associated Press in Nizhny Tagil, Russia. Workers in the city 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow that once was seen as a Putin stronghold are speaking out against the constitutional reforms that would allow him to stay in office until 2036. They are frustrated over dire living conditions that have not improved during his tenure. “I am against the constitutional changes, most importantly because they are a coronation of the czar, who reigns but does not rule — Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin,” says Nemytov. He says his monthly salary, the equivalent of $430, is not nearly enough. (AP Photo/Anton Basanayev)
In this photo taken on Sunday, June 28, 2020, Anton Zhuravlyov, 33, an operator at the Nizhny Tagil Iron and Steel Works Plant (NTMK) speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in Nizhny Tagil, some 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow, Russia. Workers in the city 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow that once was seen as a Putin stronghold are speaking out against the constitutional reforms that would allow him to stay in office until 2036. They cite growing frustration over their dire living conditions that have not improved during his tenure. “I think (the vote) is just a show. It is more for Putin to show that, ‘Look, the people support me, I am still needed, I am in demand,’" said Zhuravlyov. (AP Photo/Anton Basanayev)
In this photo taken on Sunday, June 28, 2020, Anton Zhuravlyov, 33, an operator at the Nizhny Tagil Iron and Steel Works Plant (NTMK), is interviewed by The Associated Press in Nizhny Tagil, Russia. Workers in the city 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow that once was seen as a Putin stronghold are speaking out against the constitutional reforms that would allow him to stay in office until 2036. They cite growing frustration over their dire living conditions that have not improved during his tenure. “I think (the vote) is just a show. It is more for Putin to show that, ‘Look, the people support me, I am still needed, I am in demand,’" said Zhuravlyov. (AP Photo/Anton Basanayev)
FILE - In this May 18, 2012, file photo, Igor Kholmanskikh, a section head at the Uralvagonzavod tank factory in the Urals city of Nizhny Tagil, that builds battle tanks, meets with Russian President Vladimir Putin, in the Novo-Ogaryovo residence outside Moscow, Russia. Kholmanskih, a foreman at the state tank and railroad car factory Uralvagonzavod, appeared on Putin’s annual nationwide phone-in marathon in December 2011 and denounced the mass protests occurring in Moscow at the time as a threat to “stability." (Yana Lapikova, Sputnik/Government Pool Photo via AP, File)
In this photo taken on Sunday, June 28, 2020, Nadezhda Zhuravlyova, 36, a local activist, speaks during her interview with The Associated Press in Nizhny Tagil, some 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow, Russia. In 2011, the industrial city of Nizhny Tagil was dubbed “Putingrad” for its residents’ fervent support of Russian President Vladimir Putin. Zhuravlyova says a lot has changed since then, citing economic conditions that have not improved during Putin’s time in office. (AP Photo/Anton Basanayev)
In this photo taken on Sunday, June 28, 2020, Nadezhda Zhuravlyova, 36, a local activist, speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in Nizhny Tagil, some 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow, Russia. In 2011, the industrial city of Nizhny Tagil was dubbed “Putingrad” for its residents’ fervent support of Russian President Vladimir Putin. Zhuravlyova says a lot has changed since then, citing wages that have not kept pace with the cost of living. (AP Photo/Anton Basanayev)
This June 6, 2020, photo, shows the industrial area of Nizhny Tagil, some 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow, Russia. In 2011, the city became known as “Putingrad” for its residents’ fervent support of Russian President Vladimir Putin. Workers who once defended Putin now are speaking out against the constitutional reforms that would allow him to stay in office until 2036, saying economic conditions have worsened during his tenure. (AP Photo/Anton Basanayev)
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