Cedar Mesa Perishables Project examines 1,000-year-old fiber, wood artifacts

Southwest Life

Cedar Mesa Perishables Project examines 1,000-year-old fiber, wood artifacts

As part of the Whitmore Exploring Expedition of 1897, the Mancos ranching family of the Wetherills, including Richard Wetherill’s new wife, Marietta, excavated caves and cliff dwellings in Grand Gulch, Utah, for Ancestral Puebloan and earlier Basketmaker artifacts. Their collection, with field notes by Richard and Marietta, resides at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City.
Perfect Kiva in Grand Gulch has a restored roof installed by staff members from the Bureau of Land Management. Both the Wetherill brothers of Mancos and Charles McLoyd and C.C. Graham of Durango rushed to dig sites in Grand Gulch, just southwest of Bears Ears, in the 1890s. Their collections in museums are now helping Pueblo scholars reconnect with tools their ancient ancestors once used.
About 3 feet long, these crutches are made from two forked oak saplings and have hide underarm pads stuffed with yucca fiber. Dating to the 1200s, this is one of two nearly identical pairs of crutches documented by the Cedar Mesa Perishables Project. Some researchers believe they were used by people with osteoarthritis. Courtesy of the Field Museum of Natural History, catalog No. 21516. Photo by Laurie Webster.

Cedar Mesa Perishables Project examines 1,000-year-old fiber, wood artifacts

As part of the Whitmore Exploring Expedition of 1897, the Mancos ranching family of the Wetherills, including Richard Wetherill’s new wife, Marietta, excavated caves and cliff dwellings in Grand Gulch, Utah, for Ancestral Puebloan and earlier Basketmaker artifacts. Their collection, with field notes by Richard and Marietta, resides at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City.
Perfect Kiva in Grand Gulch has a restored roof installed by staff members from the Bureau of Land Management. Both the Wetherill brothers of Mancos and Charles McLoyd and C.C. Graham of Durango rushed to dig sites in Grand Gulch, just southwest of Bears Ears, in the 1890s. Their collections in museums are now helping Pueblo scholars reconnect with tools their ancient ancestors once used.
About 3 feet long, these crutches are made from two forked oak saplings and have hide underarm pads stuffed with yucca fiber. Dating to the 1200s, this is one of two nearly identical pairs of crutches documented by the Cedar Mesa Perishables Project. Some researchers believe they were used by people with osteoarthritis. Courtesy of the Field Museum of Natural History, catalog No. 21516. Photo by Laurie Webster.
click here to add your event
Area Events