A story of peaks and ponds: North Snowdon a Durango conquest

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A story of peaks and ponds: North Snowdon a Durango conquest

Throwing in a line is more common than hiking at Andrews Lake. Reflected in early morning water are North Snowdon, Snowdon Peak with its characteristic “W”, and Point 12,450’.
From Andrews Lake, hike roughly south on the Crater Lake Trail. Leave the established track and walk east across Snowdon Meadows. At 11,600 feet, the path splits. Either follow the blue-line route to North Snowdon, or turn south to climb Point 12,450’ and loop through Snowdon ponds.

A story of peaks and ponds: North Snowdon a Durango conquest

Throwing in a line is more common than hiking at Andrews Lake. Reflected in early morning water are North Snowdon, Snowdon Peak with its characteristic “W”, and Point 12,450’.
From Andrews Lake, hike roughly south on the Crater Lake Trail. Leave the established track and walk east across Snowdon Meadows. At 11,600 feet, the path splits. Either follow the blue-line route to North Snowdon, or turn south to climb Point 12,450’ and loop through Snowdon ponds.
Trail basics

Travel: From Durango, drive 41 miles north on U.S. Highway 550. One mile south of Molas Pass, just shy of mile marker 63, turn east at the Andrews Lake sign. It is 0.7 mile to lakeside parking with an outhouse, no water.

Difficulty: Trail, off-trail; navigation moderate; steep slopes; Class 2+ scrambling up Point 12,450’; no exposure

Map: Snowdon Peak, Colorado 7.5’ USGS Quad or Apogee Mapping

Distance, Elevation Gain, Total Time

North Snowdon: 6.0 miles, 2,000 feet, 3½ to 5 hours

Point 12,450’ and Snowdon Ponds: 8.9 miles; 2,300 feet, 5 to 7 hours

Both Hikes: 10.5 miles, 3,300 feet, 7½ to 9 hours

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