Photo: Lucky Drive Inn – 1954

Photo: Lucky Drive Inn – 1954

Look closely at this building that still exists in Durango today. Do you recognize it? If not, don’t feel too badly as the building has changed much over the years. It is located at 3211 Main Ave., diagonally across from north Main City Market. Built in 1947, it was originally called Luigi’s. The name was soon changed to the Lucky Drive Inn. It operated under that name until the late 1960s. In 1969, it became a 3.2 beer establishment named the Four Seasons and catered mostly to college students 18 to 21 years old. A 3.2 bar could only serve low-alcohol beer (3.2% or lower), but patrons needed only to be 18 years of age to be served. In the late 1970s, the name was changed to the Ozone. When the federal government raised the drinking age to 21 for all alcohol beverages in 1984, the building eventually became professional offices. It has sat empty for the last few years awaiting a new tenant. The tin building uphill to the left was a popular roller skating venue that burned to the ground in the 1960s.

Ed Horvat for Animas Museum, edhorvat@animasmuseum.org

Photo: Lucky Drive Inn – 1954

Look closely at this building that still exists in Durango today. Do you recognize it? If not, don’t feel too badly as the building has changed much over the years. It is located at 3211 Main Ave., diagonally across from north Main City Market. Built in 1947, it was originally called Luigi’s. The name was soon changed to the Lucky Drive Inn. It operated under that name until the late 1960s. In 1969, it became a 3.2 beer establishment named the Four Seasons and catered mostly to college students 18 to 21 years old. A 3.2 bar could only serve low-alcohol beer (3.2% or lower), but patrons needed only to be 18 years of age to be served. In the late 1970s, the name was changed to the Ozone. When the federal government raised the drinking age to 21 for all alcohol beverages in 1984, the building eventually became professional offices. It has sat empty for the last few years awaiting a new tenant. The tin building uphill to the left was a popular roller skating venue that burned to the ground in the 1960s.

Ed Horvat for Animas Museum, edhorvat@animasmuseum.org