Rare weather phenomenon casts strange light over Southwest Colorado

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Rare weather phenomenon casts strange light over Southwest Colorado

‘Pyrocumulous’ cloud collapses at wildfire, sending ash and smoke toward Durango
Durango photographer Dan Bender set out early Wednesday to capture the sunrise on Molas Pass. “When I stepped out of my car on the pass at about 4:30 a.m., I quite literally could not see my hand in front of my face,” he said. “There was more smoke in the sky than I have ever seen on the pass, which is about 11,000 feet.” Bender said he assumed smoke from regional wildfires would have settled overnight in the valleys, creating interesting photographs from above. “I was grossly mistaken. (But) there was a silver lining. When the sun came up, it created beautiful shades of red and orange.”
Durango photographer Dan Bender set out early Wednesday to capture the sunrise on Molas Pass. “When I stepped out of my car on the pass at about 4:30 a.m., I quite literally could not see my hand in front of my face,” he said. “There was more smoke in the sky than I have ever seen on the pass, which is about 11,000 feet.” Bender said he assumed smoke from regional wildfires would have settled overnight in the valleys, creating interesting photographs from above. “I was grossly mistaken. (But) there was a silver lining. When the sun came up, it created beautiful shades of red and orange.”

Rare weather phenomenon casts strange light over Southwest Colorado

Durango photographer Dan Bender set out early Wednesday to capture the sunrise on Molas Pass. “When I stepped out of my car on the pass at about 4:30 a.m., I quite literally could not see my hand in front of my face,” he said. “There was more smoke in the sky than I have ever seen on the pass, which is about 11,000 feet.” Bender said he assumed smoke from regional wildfires would have settled overnight in the valleys, creating interesting photographs from above. “I was grossly mistaken. (But) there was a silver lining. When the sun came up, it created beautiful shades of red and orange.”
Durango photographer Dan Bender set out early Wednesday to capture the sunrise on Molas Pass. “When I stepped out of my car on the pass at about 4:30 a.m., I quite literally could not see my hand in front of my face,” he said. “There was more smoke in the sky than I have ever seen on the pass, which is about 11,000 feet.” Bender said he assumed smoke from regional wildfires would have settled overnight in the valleys, creating interesting photographs from above. “I was grossly mistaken. (But) there was a silver lining. When the sun came up, it created beautiful shades of red and orange.”
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