Who’s dying to be green?

News

Who’s dying to be green?

Eco-friendly burials a growing trend, slow to catch on here
Noble Whitley hand planes the edges of an unfinished pine wood casket he created at his Bayfield business Trails End Pine Box Coffins. This particular model he has named “Glory” and is in the “toe pincher” historic shape where the lower section is narrower than the head section.
Noble Whitley puts the final touches on an unfinished pine wood casket he created at his Bayfield business Trails End Pine Box Coffins. This model is named “Glory” and is in the “toe pincher” historic shape where the feet section is more narrow than the head section.
A simple wooden cross such as this is a popular alternative as a grave site marker for green burials.
Noble Whitley closes an unfinished pine wood casket lined with satin that he created at his Bayfield business Trails End Pine Box Coffins.
Unless you cover a body with rocks, every burial leaves a carbon footprint, says Ryan Phelps of Hood Mortuary. Phelps stands next to a simple pine coffin with rope handles that is sometimes chosen by those who desire a green burial.
A simple wooden cross like this is chosen by some as a gravesite marker at the Hermosa Cemetery north of Durango.

Who’s dying to be green?

Noble Whitley hand planes the edges of an unfinished pine wood casket he created at his Bayfield business Trails End Pine Box Coffins. This particular model he has named “Glory” and is in the “toe pincher” historic shape where the lower section is narrower than the head section.
Noble Whitley puts the final touches on an unfinished pine wood casket he created at his Bayfield business Trails End Pine Box Coffins. This model is named “Glory” and is in the “toe pincher” historic shape where the feet section is more narrow than the head section.
A simple wooden cross such as this is a popular alternative as a grave site marker for green burials.
Noble Whitley closes an unfinished pine wood casket lined with satin that he created at his Bayfield business Trails End Pine Box Coffins.
Unless you cover a body with rocks, every burial leaves a carbon footprint, says Ryan Phelps of Hood Mortuary. Phelps stands next to a simple pine coffin with rope handles that is sometimes chosen by those who desire a green burial.
A simple wooden cross like this is chosen by some as a gravesite marker at the Hermosa Cemetery north of Durango.
Reader Comments
click here to add your event
Durango ~ Events
click here to add your event
Durango ~ Events