The autopsy, a fading practice, revealed secrets of COVID-19

Southwest Life

The autopsy, a fading practice, revealed secrets of COVID-19

Dr. Amy Rapkiewicz, pathology department chairwoman at NYU Langone Hospital – Long Island, looks at some slides from a biopsy in her office in Mineola, N.Y., on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020. Experts say the COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy at many hospitals. The procedure has helped doctors this year understand what coronavirus does to patients’ organs and how they might better treat some of the disease’s more baffling symptoms.
Dr. Amy Rapkiewicz, pathology department chairwoman at NYU Langone Hospital – Long Island, looks at slides from a biopsy in her office in Mineola, N.Y., Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020. Experts say the COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy at many hospitals. The procedure has helped doctors this year understand what coronavirus does to patients’ organs and how they might better treat some of the disease’s more baffling symptoms.
A diary of autopsies performed by Dr. Amy Rapkiewicz shows a majority of cases from early in 2019 were COVID-19 positive at NYU Langone Hospital – Long Island in Mineola, N.Y., Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020. Experts say the COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy at many hospitals. The procedure has helped doctors this year understand what coronavirus does to patients’ organs and how they might better treat some of the disease’s more baffling symptoms.
Dr. Amy Rapkiewicz, pathology department chair at NYU Langone Hospital – Long Island, shows a slide of lung effected by COVID-19 at her office in Mineola, N.Y., Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020. Experts say the COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy at many hospitals. The procedure has helped doctors this year understand what coronavirus does to patients’ organs and how they might better treat some of the disease’s more baffling symptoms.
Dr. Amy Rapkiewicz, pathology department chair at NYU Langone Hospital - Long Island, walks from her office to labs and the morgue in another building at the hospital in Mineola, N.Y., Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020. Experts say the COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy at many hospitals. The procedure has helped doctors this year understand what coronavirus does to patients’ organs and how they might better treat some of the disease’s more baffling symptoms.

The autopsy, a fading practice, revealed secrets of COVID-19

Dr. Amy Rapkiewicz, pathology department chairwoman at NYU Langone Hospital – Long Island, looks at some slides from a biopsy in her office in Mineola, N.Y., on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020. Experts say the COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy at many hospitals. The procedure has helped doctors this year understand what coronavirus does to patients’ organs and how they might better treat some of the disease’s more baffling symptoms.
Dr. Amy Rapkiewicz, pathology department chairwoman at NYU Langone Hospital – Long Island, looks at slides from a biopsy in her office in Mineola, N.Y., Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020. Experts say the COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy at many hospitals. The procedure has helped doctors this year understand what coronavirus does to patients’ organs and how they might better treat some of the disease’s more baffling symptoms.
A diary of autopsies performed by Dr. Amy Rapkiewicz shows a majority of cases from early in 2019 were COVID-19 positive at NYU Langone Hospital – Long Island in Mineola, N.Y., Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020. Experts say the COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy at many hospitals. The procedure has helped doctors this year understand what coronavirus does to patients’ organs and how they might better treat some of the disease’s more baffling symptoms.
Dr. Amy Rapkiewicz, pathology department chair at NYU Langone Hospital – Long Island, shows a slide of lung effected by COVID-19 at her office in Mineola, N.Y., Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020. Experts say the COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy at many hospitals. The procedure has helped doctors this year understand what coronavirus does to patients’ organs and how they might better treat some of the disease’s more baffling symptoms.
Dr. Amy Rapkiewicz, pathology department chair at NYU Langone Hospital - Long Island, walks from her office to labs and the morgue in another building at the hospital in Mineola, N.Y., Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020. Experts say the COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy at many hospitals. The procedure has helped doctors this year understand what coronavirus does to patients’ organs and how they might better treat some of the disease’s more baffling symptoms.