Mexico sees holiday bump in tourism amid pandemic surge

Southwest Life

Mexico sees holiday bump in tourism amid pandemic surge

Tourists stroll on the shore of Xcalacoco beach in Playa del Carmen, Quintana Roo state, Mexico, Wednesday, Jan. 6, 202, amid the new coronavirus pandemic. Quintana Roo, the country’s tourism crown jewel, home to Cancun, the Riviera Maya and Tulum, received more than 900,000 tourists spanning the end of 2020 and the start of 2021.
U.S. tourist Latron Evans and his partner Nika, frolicking ocean waters at the beach in Tulum, Quintana Roo state, Mexico, Monday, Jan. 4, 2021. Evans, a Mississippi firefighter, said he was impressed by the health measures due to the new coronavirus pandemic. “They’re taking temperatures when you enter the building and giving you hand sanitizer every place you go, it’s required. It’s not that way in the states,” he said.
A bather lies spread-eagle on the shore of Mamitas beach, in Playa del Carmen, Quintana Roo state, Mexico, Friday, Jan. 1, 2021. Concern is spreading that the winter holiday bump in tourism could be fleeting because it came as COVID-19 infections in both Mexico and the United States were reaching new heights.
Tourists chat at a local bar on the main tourist strip of Tulum, Quintana Roo state, Mexico, Monday, Jan. 4, 2021. More U.S. tourists came to Quintana Roo during this pandemic-stricken holiday season than did a year earlier when the world was just beginning to learn of the coronavirus. They account for 9 out of 10 foreign tourists, said state Tourism Secretary Marisol Vanegas.
Workers carry a mattress from one hotel cabin to another in Tulum, Quintana Roo state, Mexico, Monday, Jan. 4, 2021. Tourism, which has been affected by the new coronavirus pandemic, accounts for 87% of Quintana Roo’s gross domestic product, said state Tourism Secretary Marisol Vanegas.  
Tourists wait their turn to pose for a photo with a figurative sculpture that serves as an archway by South African artist Daniel Popper titled, “Ven a la Luz” at the Ahau Tulum resort, Quintana Roo state, Mexico, Monday, Jan. 4, 2021. Concern is spreading that the winter holiday bump in tourism could be fleeting because it came as COVID-19 infections in both Mexico and the United States were reaching new heights.
A tourist, wearing a protective face mask, stands still as an employee measures her body temperature as a preventive measure amid the new coronavirus pandemic, upon her arrival to the Mayan ruins in Tulum, Quintana Roo state, Mexico, Tuesday, Jan. 5, 2021.
Tourists, required to wear protective face masks amid the new coronavirus pandemic, visit the Mayan ruins of Tulum in Quintana Roo state, Mexico, Tuesday, Jan. 5, 2021. More U.S. tourists came to Quintana Roo during this pandemic-stricken holiday season than did a year earlier when the world was just beginning to learn of COVID-19. They account for 9 out of 10 foreign tourists, said state Tourism Secretary Marisol Vanegas.
Tourists, required to wear protective face masks amid the new coronavirus pandemic, visit the Mayan ruins of Tulum in Quintana Roo state, Mexico, Tuesday, Jan. 5, 2021. Tourism accounts for 87% of Quintana Roo’s gross domestic product, said state Tourism Secretary Marisol Vanegas. The state lost some 90,000 tourism jobs in the formal economy that depend on tourism due to the new coronavirus pandemic.
Roving musicians “Los Compas” approach a group of tourists on the shore of Mamitas beach, in Playa del Carmen, Quintana Roo state, Mexico, Tuesday, Jan. 5, 2021, amid the new coronavirus pandemic. Tens of thousands of American tourists descended on Mexico’s glittering Caribbean beaches at the close of 2020 and the start of 2021, taking a break from the pandemic winter in the United States.
A tourist relaxes on the shore of Mamitas beach amid the new coronavirus pandemic in Playa del Carmen, Quintana Roo state, Mexico, Tuesday, Jan. 5, 2021. Concern is spreading that the winter holiday bump in tourism could be fleeting because it came as COVID-19 infections in both Mexico and the United States were reaching new heights.

Mexico sees holiday bump in tourism amid pandemic surge

Tourists stroll on the shore of Xcalacoco beach in Playa del Carmen, Quintana Roo state, Mexico, Wednesday, Jan. 6, 202, amid the new coronavirus pandemic. Quintana Roo, the country’s tourism crown jewel, home to Cancun, the Riviera Maya and Tulum, received more than 900,000 tourists spanning the end of 2020 and the start of 2021.
U.S. tourist Latron Evans and his partner Nika, frolicking ocean waters at the beach in Tulum, Quintana Roo state, Mexico, Monday, Jan. 4, 2021. Evans, a Mississippi firefighter, said he was impressed by the health measures due to the new coronavirus pandemic. “They’re taking temperatures when you enter the building and giving you hand sanitizer every place you go, it’s required. It’s not that way in the states,” he said.
A bather lies spread-eagle on the shore of Mamitas beach, in Playa del Carmen, Quintana Roo state, Mexico, Friday, Jan. 1, 2021. Concern is spreading that the winter holiday bump in tourism could be fleeting because it came as COVID-19 infections in both Mexico and the United States were reaching new heights.
Tourists chat at a local bar on the main tourist strip of Tulum, Quintana Roo state, Mexico, Monday, Jan. 4, 2021. More U.S. tourists came to Quintana Roo during this pandemic-stricken holiday season than did a year earlier when the world was just beginning to learn of the coronavirus. They account for 9 out of 10 foreign tourists, said state Tourism Secretary Marisol Vanegas.
Workers carry a mattress from one hotel cabin to another in Tulum, Quintana Roo state, Mexico, Monday, Jan. 4, 2021. Tourism, which has been affected by the new coronavirus pandemic, accounts for 87% of Quintana Roo’s gross domestic product, said state Tourism Secretary Marisol Vanegas.  
Tourists wait their turn to pose for a photo with a figurative sculpture that serves as an archway by South African artist Daniel Popper titled, “Ven a la Luz” at the Ahau Tulum resort, Quintana Roo state, Mexico, Monday, Jan. 4, 2021. Concern is spreading that the winter holiday bump in tourism could be fleeting because it came as COVID-19 infections in both Mexico and the United States were reaching new heights.
A tourist, wearing a protective face mask, stands still as an employee measures her body temperature as a preventive measure amid the new coronavirus pandemic, upon her arrival to the Mayan ruins in Tulum, Quintana Roo state, Mexico, Tuesday, Jan. 5, 2021.
Tourists, required to wear protective face masks amid the new coronavirus pandemic, visit the Mayan ruins of Tulum in Quintana Roo state, Mexico, Tuesday, Jan. 5, 2021. More U.S. tourists came to Quintana Roo during this pandemic-stricken holiday season than did a year earlier when the world was just beginning to learn of COVID-19. They account for 9 out of 10 foreign tourists, said state Tourism Secretary Marisol Vanegas.
Tourists, required to wear protective face masks amid the new coronavirus pandemic, visit the Mayan ruins of Tulum in Quintana Roo state, Mexico, Tuesday, Jan. 5, 2021. Tourism accounts for 87% of Quintana Roo’s gross domestic product, said state Tourism Secretary Marisol Vanegas. The state lost some 90,000 tourism jobs in the formal economy that depend on tourism due to the new coronavirus pandemic.
Roving musicians “Los Compas” approach a group of tourists on the shore of Mamitas beach, in Playa del Carmen, Quintana Roo state, Mexico, Tuesday, Jan. 5, 2021, amid the new coronavirus pandemic. Tens of thousands of American tourists descended on Mexico’s glittering Caribbean beaches at the close of 2020 and the start of 2021, taking a break from the pandemic winter in the United States.
A tourist relaxes on the shore of Mamitas beach amid the new coronavirus pandemic in Playa del Carmen, Quintana Roo state, Mexico, Tuesday, Jan. 5, 2021. Concern is spreading that the winter holiday bump in tourism could be fleeting because it came as COVID-19 infections in both Mexico and the United States were reaching new heights.
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