Reservation’s remotest corners get light with small-scale, solar-wind systems

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Reservation’s remotest corners get light with small-scale, solar-wind systems

Daily chores around the house for Maria and Erika Johnson are different than many American children. In addition to taking care of their pets and cleaning their rooms, the girls are tasked with monitoring the battery levels of the wind-solar system that powers their home. The Navajo Nation family has no access to traditional electricity.
Monica Johnson’s mother, Esther, rests outside the family home on the Navajo Nation reservation in New Mexico. A combination solar-wind energy array system works in the background to capture the sun’s energy and convert it to limited electrical power for the family home. The home does not have access to traditional electricity.
A rent-to-own solar-wind hybrid power unit installed last year at the Johnson family home on the Navajo Nation reservation in New Mexico allowed the family to have a refrigerator for the first time. Maria Johnson, 9, details how the new appliance has changed the way the family eats and lives. She no longer wakes to find the milk for her morning cereal spoiled and treats such as ice cream and cold condiments now are available, she said.

Reservation’s remotest corners get light with small-scale, solar-wind systems

Daily chores around the house for Maria and Erika Johnson are different than many American children. In addition to taking care of their pets and cleaning their rooms, the girls are tasked with monitoring the battery levels of the wind-solar system that powers their home. The Navajo Nation family has no access to traditional electricity.
Monica Johnson’s mother, Esther, rests outside the family home on the Navajo Nation reservation in New Mexico. A combination solar-wind energy array system works in the background to capture the sun’s energy and convert it to limited electrical power for the family home. The home does not have access to traditional electricity.
A rent-to-own solar-wind hybrid power unit installed last year at the Johnson family home on the Navajo Nation reservation in New Mexico allowed the family to have a refrigerator for the first time. Maria Johnson, 9, details how the new appliance has changed the way the family eats and lives. She no longer wakes to find the milk for her morning cereal spoiled and treats such as ice cream and cold condiments now are available, she said.
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