It’s the oldest trick in the book

Sports

It’s the oldest trick in the book

The ol’ fake-to-third, throw-to-first pickoff ploy might just get picked off itself by MLB
Last August, with Los Angeles leading 6-4 at Yankee Stadium, New York put men at the corners with two outs in the ninth inning. Rookie Jordan Walden bluffed toward third a couple of times, then did it again and trapped Curtis Granderson off first for the final out. It’s called the “horn” – the name comes from managers extending their index and pinky fingers in a “Hook ’em Horns” gesture, indicating opposing runners at first and third.
Colorado Rockies left-hander Greg Smith can play a pickoff to first base straight, but the fake-to-third, throw-to-first trick that teams routinely use is legal for right-handers but a balk to southpaws. “Us lefties can’t do that,” Yankees reliever Boone Logan said. “Besides, how often does it work? Maybe once in never.”
Sandy Alderson, chairman of the Playing Rules Committee and Mike Pelfrey’s general manager with the New York Mets, points out “it’s evolved over time what’s acceptable on what you can do at different bases.” A bluff to third is legal, for example, but the same fake to first is not.
Tampa Bay’s Carlos Pena awaits the pickoff throw while the Seattle Mariners’ Ichiro Suzuki dives back into the bag safely. The ol’ fake-to-third, throw-to-first trick that teams routinely carry in their bag of tricks might not be safe, however, next year.
Major League Baseball is looking into the way Atlanta Braves left-hander Johnny Venters, right-handed pitchers and the entire breed of pitchers in general uses pickoffs, particularly the fake-to-third, throw-to-first move.

It’s the oldest trick in the book

FILE
Last August, with Los Angeles leading 6-4 at Yankee Stadium, New York put men at the corners with two outs in the ninth inning. Rookie Jordan Walden bluffed toward third a couple of times, then did it again and trapped Curtis Granderson off first for the final out. It’s called the “horn” – the name comes from managers extending their index and pinky fingers in a “Hook ’em Horns” gesture, indicating opposing runners at first and third.
BBO
Colorado Rockies left-hander Greg Smith can play a pickoff to first base straight, but the fake-to-third, throw-to-first trick that teams routinely use is legal for right-handers but a balk to southpaws. “Us lefties can’t do that,” Yankees reliever Boone Logan said. “Besides, how often does it work? Maybe once in never.”
BBO
Sandy Alderson, chairman of the Playing Rules Committee and Mike Pelfrey’s general manager with the New York Mets, points out “it’s evolved over time what’s acceptable on what you can do at different bases.” A bluff to third is legal, for example, but the same fake to first is not.
FILE
Tampa Bay’s Carlos Pena awaits the pickoff throw while the Seattle Mariners’ Ichiro Suzuki dives back into the bag safely. The ol’ fake-to-third, throw-to-first trick that teams routinely carry in their bag of tricks might not be safe, however, next year.
BBO
Major League Baseball is looking into the way Atlanta Braves left-hander Johnny Venters, right-handed pitchers and the entire breed of pitchers in general uses pickoffs, particularly the fake-to-third, throw-to-first move.
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