Berry in demand

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Berry in demand

Farmers, chefs and healers see potential in elderberries
Farmer Terry Durham is betting on increasing demand for the elderberries he grows at River Hills Harvest, one of the nation’s largest commercial elderberry farms, near Hartsburg, Mo. Long used by folk healers in herbal remedies, elderberries are now being studied by the federal government for their potential medicinal benefits.
A large growth of ripe elderberries at River Hills Harvest must be picked by hand because the plant’s stems and leaves are toxic to humans.
Workers at River Hills Harvest use an oscillating machine to de-stem elderberries, a mechanized process being used to meet the increasing demand for the locally grown produce.
Shawn Lock pours elderberries into a container labeled with the weight and type of berry. Most elderberries come from Europe, but there is a push to grow more of them in the United States.

Berry in demand

AGR
Farmer Terry Durham is betting on increasing demand for the elderberries he grows at River Hills Harvest, one of the nation’s largest commercial elderberry farms, near Hartsburg, Mo. Long used by folk healers in herbal remedies, elderberries are now being studied by the federal government for their potential medicinal benefits.
AGR
A large growth of ripe elderberries at River Hills Harvest must be picked by hand because the plant’s stems and leaves are toxic to humans.
AGR
Workers at River Hills Harvest use an oscillating machine to de-stem elderberries, a mechanized process being used to meet the increasing demand for the locally grown produce.
AGR
Shawn Lock pours elderberries into a container labeled with the weight and type of berry. Most elderberries come from Europe, but there is a push to grow more of them in the United States.
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