Weber Fire recovery advances

Weber Fire recovery advances

Mudslides remain a threat around the burnarea

Weber Fire recovery advances

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“Maybe it’ll come back. Maybe it won’t,” said Pete Doerfer, whose alfalfa fields were damaged by a mud and ash flows after the Weber Fire.
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“I never saw so much water,” said Keith Payden, a resident of the Elk Stream Ranch subdivision. The subdivision is in the process of clearing roads and replacing culverts damaged from mud and ash flows resulting from runoff from rains after the Weber Fire.
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When they were told they had to evacuate their home during the Weber Fire, Pete and Vonnie Doerfer packed genealogy records, photos and other keepsakes into a stock trailer. The boxes of photos, paintings and records remain in their living room, brimming with life’s memories.
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Chuck Jachens, a hydrologist with the Bureau of Indian Affairs Forestry & Wildland Fire Management, looks over a map showing the scope of the Weber Fire. Jachens worked with the Bureau of Land Management to develop a stabilization and rehabilitation plan for the Weber Fire burn area.
A river of water thick with ash and mud – runoff from the Weber Fire burn area – flooded through Pete Doerfer’s alfalfa fields after a rainstorm last month.
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“Maybe it’ll come back. Maybe it won’t,” said Pete Doerfer, whose alfalfa fields were damaged by a mud and ash flows after the Weber Fire.
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