Crown jewel in peril

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Crown jewel in peril

Deterioration of Mesa Verde’s Cliff Palace prompts campaign to restore it
At Cliff Palace, “The lower portion of the southern half ... is literally shearing or slipping down,” said Scott Travis, head archeologist at Mesa Verde National Park.
Scott Travis, the head archeologist at Mesa Verde National Park, said the degradation of Cliff Palace comes from many sources.
Damage, in the lower-right corner of the photo, is visible in various places at Cliff Palace.
Scott Travis, the head archeologist at Mesa Verde National Park, said the degradation of Cliff Palace is caused by many processes, including water seepage and wear by visitors. At left is Thibault Manivel of Grenoble, France.
Scott Travis, the head archeologist at Mesa Verde National Park, said the lower portion of the southern half of the Cliff Palace “is literally shearing or slipping down.” The southern half of Cliff Palace begins on the right.
Linda Buffington, of Lamoille, Nev., and other visitors to Mesa Verde National Park look at Cliff Palace and other ancient dwellings. Mesa Verde archeologist Scott Travis said tourism is one of several factors contributing to the degradation of the ruins.
Scott Travis, the head archeologist at Mesa Verde National Park, said park staff have undertaken numerous actions to prevent damage caused by running water, including this small dam protecting this kiva.
Scott Travis, the head archeologist at Mesa Verde National Park, said degradation from tourism is minimized by controlling the areas accessible to visitors.
Scott Travis, the head archeologist at Mesa Verde National Park, said park staff have taken numerous actions to control runoff, including this hose running from a crack in the alcove to a bucket.

Crown jewel in peril

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At Cliff Palace, “The lower portion of the southern half ... is literally shearing or slipping down,” said Scott Travis, head archeologist at Mesa Verde National Park.
Purchase
Scott Travis, the head archeologist at Mesa Verde National Park, said the degradation of Cliff Palace comes from many sources.
Purchase
Damage, in the lower-right corner of the photo, is visible in various places at Cliff Palace.
Purchase
Scott Travis, the head archeologist at Mesa Verde National Park, said the degradation of Cliff Palace is caused by many processes, including water seepage and wear by visitors. At left is Thibault Manivel of Grenoble, France.
Purchase
Scott Travis, the head archeologist at Mesa Verde National Park, said the lower portion of the southern half of the Cliff Palace “is literally shearing or slipping down.” The southern half of Cliff Palace begins on the right.
Purchase
Linda Buffington, of Lamoille, Nev., and other visitors to Mesa Verde National Park look at Cliff Palace and other ancient dwellings. Mesa Verde archeologist Scott Travis said tourism is one of several factors contributing to the degradation of the ruins.
Purchase
Scott Travis, the head archeologist at Mesa Verde National Park, said park staff have undertaken numerous actions to prevent damage caused by running water, including this small dam protecting this kiva.
Purchase
Scott Travis, the head archeologist at Mesa Verde National Park, said degradation from tourism is minimized by controlling the areas accessible to visitors.
Purchase
Scott Travis, the head archeologist at Mesa Verde National Park, said park staff have taken numerous actions to control runoff, including this hose running from a crack in the alcove to a bucket.
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