The Grand: Feel the sting

Southwest Life

The Grand: Feel the sting

Scorpion, chilly water, hot hike make myriad memories from PBS trip
In her book Down Canyon, Ann Zwinger accurately wrote that a Grand Canyon river trip represents “hours of quiet contemplation punctuated by moments of sheer terror.” As for the canyon itself, President Theodore Roosevelt called it “the one great sight which every American should see.”
In 1889 Frank Brown, president of the Denver, Colorado Canyons and California Pacific Railroad Co., sought to build a railroad through Grand Canyon. Brown wheedled thousands from investors but was too cheap to buy lifejackets for the survey crew. He and two other members of the survey paid the ultimate price. This memorial is etched at river’s edge.
Trip leader Nate Klema comes from a serious white-water river-running family from Durango. He taught trip participants the value of wearing wet cotton clothing in the Grand Canyon’s July desert heat.
Bursting from the canyon’s redwall layer, Vasey’s Paradise, home to the endangered Kanab amber snail, is an anomaly along the Colorado River’s desert corridor.
In Marble Canyon, the Bureau of Reclamation sought to build a dam in the mid-1960s. The bureau constructed a support tunnel, and these rusty tools are found at the tunnel’s entrance.
We head down the Colorado River toward the inner gorge, looking over the shoulder of Arizona Raft Adventures boatman Bill Mobley.

The Grand: Feel the sting

In her book Down Canyon, Ann Zwinger accurately wrote that a Grand Canyon river trip represents “hours of quiet contemplation punctuated by moments of sheer terror.” As for the canyon itself, President Theodore Roosevelt called it “the one great sight which every American should see.”
In 1889 Frank Brown, president of the Denver, Colorado Canyons and California Pacific Railroad Co., sought to build a railroad through Grand Canyon. Brown wheedled thousands from investors but was too cheap to buy lifejackets for the survey crew. He and two other members of the survey paid the ultimate price. This memorial is etched at river’s edge.
Trip leader Nate Klema comes from a serious white-water river-running family from Durango. He taught trip participants the value of wearing wet cotton clothing in the Grand Canyon’s July desert heat.
Bursting from the canyon’s redwall layer, Vasey’s Paradise, home to the endangered Kanab amber snail, is an anomaly along the Colorado River’s desert corridor.
In Marble Canyon, the Bureau of Reclamation sought to build a dam in the mid-1960s. The bureau constructed a support tunnel, and these rusty tools are found at the tunnel’s entrance.
We head down the Colorado River toward the inner gorge, looking over the shoulder of Arizona Raft Adventures boatman Bill Mobley.
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