‘Darkmold’ dig reshapes our understanding of Basketmakers

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‘Darkmold’ dig reshapes our understanding of Basketmakers

But question lingers: Where did the Native Americans migrate?
David Hencmann, an anthropology graduate of Fort Lewis College, examines a small pot unearthed at the Darkmold site in the north Animas Valley, as Mona Charles examines a corncob from the same site under a microscope in her lab at Center for Southwest Studies on the college’s campus. Charles taught the FLC Archaeological Field School for 14 years through 2011. The Darkmold site was the platform for the FLC field school from 1999 to 2008.
SHAUN STANLEY/Durango Herald
Michelle Phair, a student in the anthropology department at Fort Lewis College, examines a tiny turquoise trade piece unearthed at the Darkmold site in the north Animas Valley. The item represents the earliest use of a turquoise trade item used in the Durango area.

‘Darkmold’ dig reshapes our understanding of Basketmakers

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David Hencmann, an anthropology graduate of Fort Lewis College, examines a small pot unearthed at the Darkmold site in the north Animas Valley, as Mona Charles examines a corncob from the same site under a microscope in her lab at Center for Southwest Studies on the college’s campus. Charles taught the FLC Archaeological Field School for 14 years through 2011. The Darkmold site was the platform for the FLC field school from 1999 to 2008.
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SHAUN STANLEY/Durango Herald
Michelle Phair, a student in the anthropology department at Fort Lewis College, examines a tiny turquoise trade piece unearthed at the Darkmold site in the north Animas Valley. The item represents the earliest use of a turquoise trade item used in the Durango area.
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