Mining towns hope for uranium comeback

Mining towns hope for uranium comeback

SW Colo. senses economic lift if nuclear industry rebounds
This view from the site of the old uranium mill outside Uravan shows the vista looking down the valley toward the now-abandoned town. A Canadian company’s plans for a new uranium and vanadium mill nearby are giving some residents hope that the area once again can be the uranium capital it used to be. But there are challenges, including opposition from environmentalists.
Jane Thompson, left, and her sister Sharon Johannsen survey the land that once was a baseball field in Uravan, a former uranium milling company town ton the banks of the San Miguel River less than 50 miles from the Utah border. At its peak, the town of 800 residents had housing, a swimming pool and a recreation center built by the industry. The site was razed by the Environmental Protection Agency and the state health department because of radioactive contamination after 75 years of radium, uranium and vanadium mining and milling operations.
A Canadian company’s plans for a new uranium and vanadium mill near Uravan are giving some residents hope that the area once again can be the uranium capital it used to be. But there are challenges, including opposition from environmentalists. This view shows the site of the old uranium mill and equipment buried in concrete and rocks.

Mining towns hope for uranium comeback

This view from the site of the old uranium mill outside Uravan shows the vista looking down the valley toward the now-abandoned town. A Canadian company’s plans for a new uranium and vanadium mill nearby are giving some residents hope that the area once again can be the uranium capital it used to be. But there are challenges, including opposition from environmentalists.
Jane Thompson, left, and her sister Sharon Johannsen survey the land that once was a baseball field in Uravan, a former uranium milling company town ton the banks of the San Miguel River less than 50 miles from the Utah border. At its peak, the town of 800 residents had housing, a swimming pool and a recreation center built by the industry. The site was razed by the Environmental Protection Agency and the state health department because of radioactive contamination after 75 years of radium, uranium and vanadium mining and milling operations.
A Canadian company’s plans for a new uranium and vanadium mill near Uravan are giving some residents hope that the area once again can be the uranium capital it used to be. But there are challenges, including opposition from environmentalists. This view shows the site of the old uranium mill and equipment buried in concrete and rocks.
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