Movie is the message

Img ?1512216803

CLOSE TO HOME: RESPONDING TO SEXUAL ASSAULT IN OUR COMMUNITY

Arts & Entertainment

Movie is the message

Community Cinema series finds a home at Discovery Museum
America Ferrera plays with children at the New Light Crèche in Kolkata, India, in a scene from “Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide.” The PBS film will kick off the new Durango Community Cinema series on Wednesday at the Durango Discovery Museum.
Meg Ryan with Somana Long and Srey Pov at Angkor Wat in Siem Reap, Cambodia in a scene from “Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide,” which will kick off the Community Cinema Series at Discovery Museum.
Nicholas Kristof in Somaliland. The book by the New York Times columnist, co-written with Cheryl WuDunn, forms the basis for the film “Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide.” The documentary is the opening film Wednesday for the Durango Community Cinema series at the Durango Discovery Museum.
Community Cinema Series film schedule to run through June

All screenings are free in the Boiler Room Theater at the Durango Discovery Museum, 1333 Camino del Rio. Doors will open at 5:30 p.m. and films will start at 6 p.m.



Sept. 19: “Half the Sky” by Maro Chermayeff. Inspired by his best selling Pulitzer Prize-winning book, author Nicholas Kristof and celebrity activists travel to nine countries. They witness courageous individuals who are confronting oppression and creating meaningful solutions through health care, education, and economic empowerment for women and girls. (Conversation will be held after the film with the Shanta Foundation and Step-Up Uganda.)

Oct. 17: “As Goes Janesville” by Brad Lichtenstein. Two years in the lives of laid-off workers, business leaders and elected officials trying to reinvent their lives and their midwestern town amid the closure of their General Motors plant and America’s worst economic crisis since the Great Depression.

Nov. 14: “Solar Mamas” by Jehane Noujaim. Rafea, who lives in a small Jordanian village, is 30 years old with four children and a husband eager to take a third wife. With encouragement from her country’s Ministry of Environment, she attends the Barefoot College in India to train to become a solar-energy engineer. The Barefoot College provides training to the rural poor to empower them to make their communities sustainable.

Jan. 16: “Soul Food Junkies” by Byron Hurt. This film delves into the historical and controversial relationship between the black community and soul food. How does our affinity for soul food and its dietary traditions affect the health of the black community?

Feb. 20: “The Powerbroker” by Bonnie Boswell. During the 1950s and ’60s, civil-rights leader Whitney Young navigated a divided society. He challenged America’s white business and political leaders directly, but his efforts to open the doors for equal opportunity were often attacked by black Americans who felt his methods were in contrast with the Black Power Movement of the time.

March 20: “Wonder Women! The Untold Story of American Superheroines” by Kristy Guevara-Flanagan. From the birth of the comic book superheroine in the 1940s, to the blockbusters of today, “Wonder Women!” looks at how popular representations of powerful women often reflect society’s anxieties about women’s liberation.

April 18: “The Island President by Jon Shenk, Bonni Cohen and Richard Berge. After bringing democracy to his country, President Mohamed Nasheed of the Maldives, the lowest-lying country in the world, takes up the fight to keep his homeland from disappearing under the sea.

May 16: “The Revolutionary Optimists” by Maren Grainger. In the poorest neighborhoods of Calcutta, a lawyer-turned-social-entrepreneur is empowering young girls and boys to take an active role in transforming their own lives.

June 19: “Love Free or Die” by Macky Alston. Faith, love, marriage, homosexuality and the Episcopal Church collide in the first openly gay bishop, Gene Robinson of New Hampshire.





Source: Rocky Mountain PBS

Movie is the message

America Ferrera plays with children at the New Light Crèche in Kolkata, India, in a scene from “Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide.” The PBS film will kick off the new Durango Community Cinema series on Wednesday at the Durango Discovery Museum.
Meg Ryan with Somana Long and Srey Pov at Angkor Wat in Siem Reap, Cambodia in a scene from “Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide,” which will kick off the Community Cinema Series at Discovery Museum.
Nicholas Kristof in Somaliland. The book by the New York Times columnist, co-written with Cheryl WuDunn, forms the basis for the film “Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide.” The documentary is the opening film Wednesday for the Durango Community Cinema series at the Durango Discovery Museum.
Reader Comments
click here to add your event
Durango ~ Events
click here to add your event
Durango ~ Events