Shock the mine waste

Shock the mine waste

Pilot project treats toxic metals flowing into Animas River
Ar 120929722
Water flows out of the American Tunnel in the Gladstone area north of Silverton where the Animas River Stakeholders Group wants to eliminate toxic waste from four closed mines.
Ar 120929722
Ep 120929722
Nick Josties, director of Waste Water Management, takes a sample of treated water from the American Tunnel. Lucy Hunter with Odisea LLC holds the sample bottle. They are testing toxic water from the long-closed Sunnyside Mine which, with three other abandoned mines in the area, is polluting Cement Creek with heavy metals.
Ep 120929722
Ep 120929722
Consultants set up a water-treatment experiment near the opening of the American Tunnel in the Gladstone ghost town north of Silverton. Zinc, iron, copper, lead, cadmium, manganese and mercury are all being released from old mines into Cement Creek, and the heavy metals eventually reach the Animas River.
Ep 120929722
Ep 120929722
Mike Rigby, left, with Electro-Chemistry LLC, and Jeff Ruppert, with Odisea LLC, work on the flow-though reactor that treats water from the American Tunnel at the Sunnyside Mine north of Silverton. The reactor applies electricity to water and then the dissolved metals settle out to form sediment.
Ep 120929722
Ep 120929722
Water flows out of the American Tunnel in the Gladstone area north of Silverton where the Animas River Stakeholders Group wants to eliminate toxic waste from four closed mines.
Ep 120929722
Ep 120929722
Nick Josties, director of Waste Water Management, lifts up a reactor after treating water from the American Tunnel in the Gladstone ghost town north of Silverton. The batch reactor applies electricity to water and then the dissolved metals precipitate out as sediment.
Ep 120929722
Reader Comments
click here to add your event
Durango ~ Events
click here to add your event
Durango ~ Events