Building blocks of science

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Building blocks of science

Lego robotics offers fun, challenging avenue into technology education
Holden Blau, 9, blows into a sound sensor of a Lego Robot that Sam Bridgham, with Alpine Mobile Institute and Technology, brought to the Durango Public Library. Holden is the son of Natalie and Dave Blau. Bridgham is hoping to establish mobile technology labs that will travel throughout the Four Corners.
Sam Bridgham, with Alpine Mobile Institute and Technology, explains the workings of his Lego robots to Holden Blau, 9, and his sister Cassandra, 12, at the Durango Library. Holden and Cassandra are the children of Natalie and Dave Blau.
Sam Bridgham, with Alpine Mobile Institute and Technology, explains the workings of his Lego robots to Holden Blau, 9, and his sister Cassandra, 12, at the Durango Library. Holden and Cassandra are the children of Natalie and Dave Blau.
Elliott Tranum, 4, shines a laser light into a sensor that will direct the motion of a Lego Robot that Sam Bridgham, with Alpine Mobile Institute and Technology, at the Durango Library. Elliot is the son of Dave and Royce Tranum.
Dave Tranum watches his son, Elliott Tranum, 4, load a paper airplane into Lego robot launcher that Sam Bridgham, with Alpine Mobile Institute and Technology, brought to the Durango Public Library. Elliot is also the son of Royce Tranum.
Science graduates earn more

College graduates overall earn 84 percent more during their lifetimes than those with only high school diplomas, according to the Commerce Department.

But further analysis of 171 majors by the National Math and Science Initiative found that STEM majors – science, technology, engineering and math – earn higher wages: For example, petroleum engineering majors make about $120,000 a year, compared with $29,000 annually for counseling psychology majors.

Math and computer science majors earn $98,000 in salary, while early childhood education majors get paid about $36,000 annually. STEM majors also experience less joblessness.

Building blocks of science

Holden Blau, 9, blows into a sound sensor of a Lego Robot that Sam Bridgham, with Alpine Mobile Institute and Technology, brought to the Durango Public Library. Holden is the son of Natalie and Dave Blau. Bridgham is hoping to establish mobile technology labs that will travel throughout the Four Corners.
Sam Bridgham, with Alpine Mobile Institute and Technology, explains the workings of his Lego robots to Holden Blau, 9, and his sister Cassandra, 12, at the Durango Library. Holden and Cassandra are the children of Natalie and Dave Blau.
Sam Bridgham, with Alpine Mobile Institute and Technology, explains the workings of his Lego robots to Holden Blau, 9, and his sister Cassandra, 12, at the Durango Library. Holden and Cassandra are the children of Natalie and Dave Blau.
Elliott Tranum, 4, shines a laser light into a sensor that will direct the motion of a Lego Robot that Sam Bridgham, with Alpine Mobile Institute and Technology, at the Durango Library. Elliot is the son of Dave and Royce Tranum.
Dave Tranum watches his son, Elliott Tranum, 4, load a paper airplane into Lego robot launcher that Sam Bridgham, with Alpine Mobile Institute and Technology, brought to the Durango Public Library. Elliot is also the son of Royce Tranum.
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