Crossing the line from victim to bully

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Crossing the line from victim to bully

Area middle school students participate in ‘next generation’ bullying program
Loren Lapow, founding director of the hero project, guides 170 Ignacio junior high students through “Epic Day,” the cathartic, emotional, demanding and innovative inaugural event of the hero project’s ground-breaking anti-bullying program.

Crossing the line from victim to bully

Loren Lapow, founding director of the hero project, guides 170 Ignacio junior high students through “Epic Day,” the cathartic, emotional, demanding and innovative inaugural event of the hero project’s ground-breaking anti-bullying program.
Bullying a national challenge

More than 80 percent of high school students in the U.S. report witnessing bullying at least once a week, according to a national survey conducted by DoSomething.org.



A study of 75 schools and community centers in Colorado found that about 58 percent of students either engaged in physical bullying or stood by while someone else did it.

The number increased to 67 percent when it came to verbal bullying.

Bullying has become such a serious problem that 19 states, including Colorado, have anti-bullying laws.

National research shows bullying can have life-long implications. Victims are more likely to suffer from academic failure and health problems, as well as low self-esteem and inability to connect socially.

Bullies don’t fare well, either. Research shows that youths who bully typically have a criminal record by age 24, according to Build Trust, End Bullying, Improve Learning, a 2008 study by the Colorado Trust.

To learn more about bullying prevention, visit the Hero Project’s website: www.liveyourmyth.org.

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