‘Dust Bowl’ is far from dry history

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‘Dust Bowl’ is far from dry history

Ken Burns documentary to air on PBS
Farm Security Administration photographer Arthur Rothstein captured this photograph of Art Coble and his sons, south of Boise City, Okla., in April 1936. Ken Burns uses the iconic image and many other historic photos from the Library of Congress archives in his new film “The Dust Bowl,” which will air Sunday and Monday nights on PBS.
FSA photographer Dorothea Lange came across Florence Thompson and her children in a pea pickers’ camp in Nipomo, Calif., in March 1936. During the decade of Great Depression, California’s population grew by more than 20 percent , an increase of 1.3 million people. Of the 315,000 who arrived from Oklahoma, Texas, and neighboring states, only 16,000 were from the Dust Bowl itself.

‘Dust Bowl’ is far from dry history

Farm Security Administration photographer Arthur Rothstein captured this photograph of Art Coble and his sons, south of Boise City, Okla., in April 1936. Ken Burns uses the iconic image and many other historic photos from the Library of Congress archives in his new film “The Dust Bowl,” which will air Sunday and Monday nights on PBS.
FSA photographer Dorothea Lange came across Florence Thompson and her children in a pea pickers’ camp in Nipomo, Calif., in March 1936. During the decade of Great Depression, California’s population grew by more than 20 percent , an increase of 1.3 million people. Of the 315,000 who arrived from Oklahoma, Texas, and neighboring states, only 16,000 were from the Dust Bowl itself.
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