Game on

Game on

For hunting enthusiasts, butchering at home brings sense of pride, saves money
Ar 130109651
Experienced hunter Andy Holland, big game manager for Colorado Parks and Wildlife, teaches his co-worker Leigh Gillette how to process elk meat, a skill he learned from his father, also an avid hunter. Always clean work surfaces with warm, sudsy water. Consider using anti-bacterial dish washing liquid, followed by a rinse with spray bottle containing one tablespoon household bleach to a gallon of water.
Ar 130109651
Ep 130109651
Andy Holland cuts roasts out of bottom round. For tender meat, cut at a 90 percent angle to the grain. Cutting against the grain severs the fibrous muscle strands.
Ep 130109651
Ep 130109651
Elk sirloin steaks, roasts, fillets and other cuts of meat fill Andy Holland’s freezer. Keep a small food scale handy and weigh portions after cutting. Freeze in 1- or 2-pound portions, the quantity called for in most recipes. Double wrap each package – first in plastic wrap, then in freezer paper – and squeeze out all air to help prevent freezer burn.
Ep 130109651
Ep 130109651
For best results, allow meat to come to room temperature and pat dry before marinating in olive oil or citrus juice to tenderize. Saute quickly on medium-high heat; do not crowd the pan. Undercook, and let steaks rest for a few minutes before cutting.
Ep 130109651
Ep 130109651
Andy Holland, left, grinds elk meat into hamburger recently at his Durango home. At right, Leigh Gillette packages steaks and roasts for the freezer. Most meat processors advise that all fat be cut from game to cut down “gamey” flavor. Fat from beef or pork can be reincorporated into ground meat for a juicy, flavorful burger or sausage.
Ep 130109651
Reader Comments
click here to add your event
Durango ~ Events
click here to add your event
Durango ~ Events