Facial expressions

Arts & Entertainment

Facial expressions

Masks from around the globe blend art and anthropology at Arts Center
Durango Arts Center exhibits director Mary Puller describes the origin and history of some of the masks on display to Petra Hinke of Durango. The masks in the foreground are from the Baining Tribal Fire Dance of East Britain, Papua, New Guinea, the larger of which represents clan spirits important for protection and healing. Following the coming-of-age ceremony, the masks are abandoned in the forest surrounding the village. On April 12, Leslie Martin will give a presentation that includes video footage of the Baining Fire Dance.
This mid-20th century knitted mask from Altiplano, Peru is one of the more practical, as opposed to ceremonial, items in the exhibit.
The 19th century pieces from the Sino-Tibetan collection, including this hammered silver mask from the Q,ing Dynasty, are some of the oldest in the Durango Arts Center exhibit.
A mask from the Bushoong Tribe of the Democratic Republic of Congo, made during the mid 20th century.
The Kangaroo Pasola Mask is a contemporary piece from the Yaqui People of southern Arizona.
This mid-20th century Tigre mask from Zitala, Guerro, Mexico is on loan from a private collection and is not for sale.
This corner of the exhibit features Asian masks from China, Tibet and India, among other countries. The colorful headgear on the blue pedestals are Chinese children’s festival hats from the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
If you go

Masks: Creating Identity, through April 27 in the Barbara Conrad Gallery at the Durango Arts Center, 802 East Second Ave.



Today: “Central and West African Peoples and Cultures,” presentation by Alan Suits, 5-7 p.m.,

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Facial expressions

Durango Arts Center exhibits director Mary Puller describes the origin and history of some of the masks on display to Petra Hinke of Durango. The masks in the foreground are from the Baining Tribal Fire Dance of East Britain, Papua, New Guinea, the larger of which represents clan spirits important for protection and healing. Following the coming-of-age ceremony, the masks are abandoned in the forest surrounding the village. On April 12, Leslie Martin will give a presentation that includes video footage of the Baining Fire Dance.
This mid-20th century knitted mask from Altiplano, Peru is one of the more practical, as opposed to ceremonial, items in the exhibit.
The 19th century pieces from the Sino-Tibetan collection, including this hammered silver mask from the Q,ing Dynasty, are some of the oldest in the Durango Arts Center exhibit.
A mask from the Bushoong Tribe of the Democratic Republic of Congo, made during the mid 20th century.
The Kangaroo Pasola Mask is a contemporary piece from the Yaqui People of southern Arizona.
This mid-20th century Tigre mask from Zitala, Guerro, Mexico is on loan from a private collection and is not for sale.
This corner of the exhibit features Asian masks from China, Tibet and India, among other countries. The colorful headgear on the blue pedestals are Chinese children’s festival hats from the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
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