Eat like a local

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Eat like a local

Zagat picks the U.S.’s most iconic restaurants
This stone pit is what sets The Salt Lick in Driftwood, Texas, apart from almost every other renowned barbecue restaurant in the nation. Instead of just slow cooking, meats are cooked with a combination of direct cooking over the flames of oak logs on this grill and slow cooking in a smoker.
Dinner at The Salt Lick will set you back an average of $24 per person, but bring cash – the iconic Texas restaurant does not accept credit cards.
Shellfish lovers head to The Old Ebbitt Grill, established in 1856 in Washington, D.C., for happy hour deals on oysters.
For the past 100 years, locals and tourists have been filling the sidewalk and the tables at Galatoire’s on Bourbon Street in New Orleans. The elegant bistro was founded by Jean Galatoire and is still run by his descendants.
Plates of the famous potato souffles are taken to tables in the dinning room of Galatoire’s restaurant in the French Quarter of New Orleans. Galatoire’s auctioned off the lunch tables and raised more than $96,000 for charity.
Rodleen Getsic, a visitor from La Conchita, Calif., laughs as a glass of 1979 Chateau Petrus red wine is poured from a 5-liter bottle in the dinning room of Galatoire’s restaurant in New Orleans.
Try these eateries for a taste of history

Restaurant guidebook and online publisher Zagat selected this list of 15 iconic restaurants in or near major cities. The cost is the average for dinner for one person with a drink and tip:



Atlanta: The Colonnade, $22

Austin

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Eat like a local

This stone pit is what sets The Salt Lick in Driftwood, Texas, apart from almost every other renowned barbecue restaurant in the nation. Instead of just slow cooking, meats are cooked with a combination of direct cooking over the flames of oak logs on this grill and slow cooking in a smoker.
Dinner at The Salt Lick will set you back an average of $24 per person, but bring cash – the iconic Texas restaurant does not accept credit cards.
Shellfish lovers head to The Old Ebbitt Grill, established in 1856 in Washington, D.C., for happy hour deals on oysters.
For the past 100 years, locals and tourists have been filling the sidewalk and the tables at Galatoire’s on Bourbon Street in New Orleans. The elegant bistro was founded by Jean Galatoire and is still run by his descendants.
Plates of the famous potato souffles are taken to tables in the dinning room of Galatoire’s restaurant in the French Quarter of New Orleans. Galatoire’s auctioned off the lunch tables and raised more than $96,000 for charity.
Rodleen Getsic, a visitor from La Conchita, Calif., laughs as a glass of 1979 Chateau Petrus red wine is poured from a 5-liter bottle in the dinning room of Galatoire’s restaurant in New Orleans.
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