The Curtiss flies again

News

The Curtiss flies again

Biplane is a replica of the first to soar over Durango
“We wanted it to be so authentic that people would walk in and think it was an old airplane,” said Dave Claussen, left, who built a replica of a 1913 Curtiss pusher biplane with help from Bob Danielson and a dozen or so others. The replica hangs in the D&SNGR Museum.
Dave Claussen said although the engine on his 1913 Curtiss pusher replica is a mock-up, all the controls for the plane, including the yoke, elevators, rudder, and ailerons, work like the real thing. Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Museum curator Jeff Ellingson finishes securing the plane to the ceiling.
“We crammed six months worth of work, easy, into six weeks,” said Dave Claussen, left, who built a replica of a 1913 Curtiss pusher airplane with the help of 14 part-time workers and volunteers. Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Museum Curator Jeff Ellingson, center, and Bob Danielson, who helped build the replica, look over the plane after it was installed at the museum.
An unknown photographer snapped this shot of a 1913 Curtiss pusher biplane as it soared over the mesa that is now home to Fort Lewis College during one of four of the first flights over the city of Durango in 1913.

The Curtiss flies again

“We wanted it to be so authentic that people would walk in and think it was an old airplane,” said Dave Claussen, left, who built a replica of a 1913 Curtiss pusher biplane with help from Bob Danielson and a dozen or so others. The replica hangs in the D&SNGR Museum.
Dave Claussen said although the engine on his 1913 Curtiss pusher replica is a mock-up, all the controls for the plane, including the yoke, elevators, rudder, and ailerons, work like the real thing. Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Museum curator Jeff Ellingson finishes securing the plane to the ceiling.
“We crammed six months worth of work, easy, into six weeks,” said Dave Claussen, left, who built a replica of a 1913 Curtiss pusher airplane with the help of 14 part-time workers and volunteers. Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Museum Curator Jeff Ellingson, center, and Bob Danielson, who helped build the replica, look over the plane after it was installed at the museum.
An unknown photographer snapped this shot of a 1913 Curtiss pusher biplane as it soared over the mesa that is now home to Fort Lewis College during one of four of the first flights over the city of Durango in 1913.
Reader Comments
click here to add your event
Durango ~ Events
click here to add your event
Durango ~ Events