MLB rules umpires foul on the rule

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MLB rules umpires foul on the rule

For the second time this week, umps called out on strikes
Major League Baseball suspended umpire and crew chief Fieldin Culbreth for two games Friday because he was in charge of the group that allowed Houston Astros manager Bo Porter to improperly switch relievers in the middle of an inning after the pitcher threw just one pitch. The rule states a pitcher must face at least one batter before being pulled for another reliever.
Fieldin Culbreth’s suspension came on the heels of a blown call by Angel Hernandez and his crew after they incorrectly ruled, despite using instant replay, that Oakland’s Adam Rosales’ home run didn’t actually clear the outfield fence in the ninth inning, causing manager Bob Melvin’s eventual ejection.
The mistake by Angel Hernandez and his umpiring crew drew attention all over the majors. Pittsburgh manager Clint Hurdle came to Bob Melvin’s defense and said he’d never before seen an obvious miss despite replay. “This is the first one where there definitely is a line drawn where you go, ‘Wow,’” he said.

MLB rules umpires foul on the rule

Major League Baseball suspended umpire and crew chief Fieldin Culbreth for two games Friday because he was in charge of the group that allowed Houston Astros manager Bo Porter to improperly switch relievers in the middle of an inning after the pitcher threw just one pitch. The rule states a pitcher must face at least one batter before being pulled for another reliever.
Fieldin Culbreth’s suspension came on the heels of a blown call by Angel Hernandez and his crew after they incorrectly ruled, despite using instant replay, that Oakland’s Adam Rosales’ home run didn’t actually clear the outfield fence in the ninth inning, causing manager Bob Melvin’s eventual ejection.
The mistake by Angel Hernandez and his umpiring crew drew attention all over the majors. Pittsburgh manager Clint Hurdle came to Bob Melvin’s defense and said he’d never before seen an obvious miss despite replay. “This is the first one where there definitely is a line drawn where you go, ‘Wow,’” he said.
Pitchers and the ump fined for Rays’ brouhaha

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – Major League Baseball fined umpire Tom Hallion and Tampa Bay pitchers David Price, Jeremy Hellickson and Matt Moore for their dustup two weekends ago.
Each of the pitchers were fined $1,000. It was unknown how much Hallion was docked.
Hallion was the plate umpire and crew chief during a game April 28 at Chicago against the White Sox, and Price thought he missed a pitch. They exchanged words, and the AL Cy Young winner accused Hallion of directing an expletive at him while he walked off the field.
Hallion called Price a “liar” after the game.
Price, Hellickson and Moore later made comments about Hallion on Twitter. The pitchers were fined for violating MLB’s social media policy that forbids “displaying or transmitting content that questions the impartiality of or otherwise denigrates a major league umpire.”
Asked if he was happy the saga was over, Price said, “I guess so.”
In his next start in Denver, Price again was umpired by that same crew. He was asked whether or not he was concerned Hallion or anybody else from his crew would hold a grudge against him.
“Not at all,” Price said. “I don’t think umpires hold grudges. If something happened directly to that umpire, maybe. I don’t know. I don’t think so.”
The liar remark rankled Price.
“I’m not a liar. I still stand behind what I said,” Price said last week in the Coors Field clubhouse. “I don’t feel like that type of stuff should happen. It shouldn’t happen in any environment. Nobody that is an employee or a co-worker or your boss, that’s not the way you talk to people. It’s not the way you talk to anybody; I don’t care if you see a bum on the street.
“It’s the way I feel, the way I was raised. I feel like I was raised extremely well by my parents. I stand firm behind my beliefs.
“I didn’t want him to get fined; I didn’t want him to get suspended,” Price said. “I definitely didn’t want him to get fired, anything like that, because that doesn’t just affect him, but it affects his family.”
Rays manager Joe Maddon considered the matter closed. Now, he wants his ace to turn all his concentration toward the mound.
“It’s about moving on. It’s about focusing on your team, your team doing well and not really worrying about the other stuff,” Maddon said. “I’m sure Tommy feels pretty badly about it still. So, let’s just move on. I thought it got way too much traction, and I don’t want to add to it.”

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