Why poultry raised in Durango can’t go to market

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Why poultry raised in Durango can’t go to market

Turns out, it really is a chicken and egg problem
When this cornish rock hen stops laying eggs, there is a good chance it will become the main ingredient in a pot of John and Julie Ott’s chicken stew. The Otts at James Ranch used to raise and slaughter 2,500 meat chickens a year. “We used to have a lot of happy customers, but we stopped raising them because they did not do very well at this altitude and being in the open range,” Julie Ott said.
Stanton Ott, 13, helped to raise meat chickens at the family farm, James Ranch. The family raises meat chickens only for themselves.
Judy Rohwer, a Cortez farmer, says it’s ironic that you can legally buy marijuana but can’t legally buy a fresh butchered chicken.

Why poultry raised in Durango can’t go to market

When this cornish rock hen stops laying eggs, there is a good chance it will become the main ingredient in a pot of John and Julie Ott’s chicken stew. The Otts at James Ranch used to raise and slaughter 2,500 meat chickens a year. “We used to have a lot of happy customers, but we stopped raising them because they did not do very well at this altitude and being in the open range,” Julie Ott said.
Stanton Ott, 13, helped to raise meat chickens at the family farm, James Ranch. The family raises meat chickens only for themselves.
Judy Rohwer, a Cortez farmer, says it’s ironic that you can legally buy marijuana but can’t legally buy a fresh butchered chicken.
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