Invasive species get the ax

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CLOSE TO HOME: RESPONDING TO SEXUAL ASSAULT IN OUR COMMUNITY

Invasive species get the ax

Durango removing nonnative trees from riverside property
Jake Lee, crew leader with the Southwest Conservation Corps, cuts a collar around a Russian olive tree in Oxbow Park and Preserve along the Animas River north of Durango. The city of Durango is in the process of removing invasive Russian olive and Siberian elm trees.
Wearing a bandana for his allergies, Jake Tallman with the Southwest Conservation Corps applies a herbicide to a collar cut around a Russian olive tree. The invasive species can deprive native plants, such as cottonwoods and rabbit brush of nutrients.
The light-colored, invasive Russian olive tree has begun taking over areas in Oxbow Park and Preserve along the Animas River north of Durango.
Invasive Siberian elm trees are one type of tree the city is removing in Oxbow Park and Preserve along the Animas River north of Durango.
The light-colored, invasive Russian olive tree has begun taking over areas in Oxbow Park and Preserve along the Animas River north of Durango.
Invasive Russian olive and Siberian elm trees force out native trees such as these cottons woods and willow trees growing in Oxbow Park and Preserve along the Animas River north of Durango.
Jake Lee, crew leader with the Southwest Conservation Corps, cuts a collar around a Russian olive tree in Oxbow Park and Preserve along the Animas River north of Durango. The city of Durango is in the process of removing invasive Russian Olive and Siberian elm trees.
Ron Stoner, Durango city arborist, talks about the invasive Russian olive trees, which can overtake an area quickly. They are growing in Oxbow Park and Preserve along the Animas River north of Durango. The city with the help of Southwest Conservation Corp. is removing them.

Invasive species get the ax

Jake Lee, crew leader with the Southwest Conservation Corps, cuts a collar around a Russian olive tree in Oxbow Park and Preserve along the Animas River north of Durango. The city of Durango is in the process of removing invasive Russian olive and Siberian elm trees.
Wearing a bandana for his allergies, Jake Tallman with the Southwest Conservation Corps applies a herbicide to a collar cut around a Russian olive tree. The invasive species can deprive native plants, such as cottonwoods and rabbit brush of nutrients.
The light-colored, invasive Russian olive tree has begun taking over areas in Oxbow Park and Preserve along the Animas River north of Durango.
Invasive Siberian elm trees are one type of tree the city is removing in Oxbow Park and Preserve along the Animas River north of Durango.
The light-colored, invasive Russian olive tree has begun taking over areas in Oxbow Park and Preserve along the Animas River north of Durango.
Invasive Russian olive and Siberian elm trees force out native trees such as these cottons woods and willow trees growing in Oxbow Park and Preserve along the Animas River north of Durango.
Jake Lee, crew leader with the Southwest Conservation Corps, cuts a collar around a Russian olive tree in Oxbow Park and Preserve along the Animas River north of Durango. The city of Durango is in the process of removing invasive Russian Olive and Siberian elm trees.
Ron Stoner, Durango city arborist, talks about the invasive Russian olive trees, which can overtake an area quickly. They are growing in Oxbow Park and Preserve along the Animas River north of Durango. The city with the help of Southwest Conservation Corp. is removing them.
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