Water security in a dry land

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Water security in a dry land

Durango’s right to 1.6% of Lake Nighthorse water provides options
Durango holds the rights to 1.6 percent of Lake Nighthorse’s water, which City Manager Ron LeBlanc says offers “a secure source of water forever.”
Daryl Crites, a surveyor, stakes an access road at the Twin Buttes development off west U.S. Highway 160 on Monday. City officials say water from Lake Nighthorse gives the city options to handle growth.
Former Gov. Bill Ritter, right, thanks Fred Kroeger of Durango, for his years of involvement with the Animas-La Plata Project, during a ceremony in June 2010 at Lake Nighthorse. City Manager Ron LeBlanc says Durango’s share of Lake Nighthorse water means the city can now store the water it owns.

Water security in a dry land

Durango holds the rights to 1.6 percent of Lake Nighthorse’s water, which City Manager Ron LeBlanc says offers “a secure source of water forever.”
Daryl Crites, a surveyor, stakes an access road at the Twin Buttes development off west U.S. Highway 160 on Monday. City officials say water from Lake Nighthorse gives the city options to handle growth.
Former Gov. Bill Ritter, right, thanks Fred Kroeger of Durango, for his years of involvement with the Animas-La Plata Project, during a ceremony in June 2010 at Lake Nighthorse. City Manager Ron LeBlanc says Durango’s share of Lake Nighthorse water means the city can now store the water it owns.
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