Hiking Shi Shi

Southwest Life

Hiking Shi Shi

Solitude and sea stacks are the draw at pristine Washington beach
Sea stacks rise from the Pacific Ocean at the north end of Shi Shi Beach in Washington state’s Olympic National Park. One of the most pristine beaches in Washington state, Shi Shi provides blissful disconnect from rush of modern life.
A young boy riding a block of Styrofoam is pushed into the waves by a man at Shi Shi Beach. Debris from the tsunami in Japan in 2011 continues to wash up on the beach.
Point of Archers offers hikers and campers great spots to explore sea creatures during low tide.
Shi Shi (pronounced shy shy) was one of the last additions to Olympic National Park in 1976.
A plastic drum sits ashore at Shi Shi Beach in Washington state’s Olympic National Park. Despite it’s relative isolation, Shi Shi is sprinkled with debris washed up by ocean currents – including drums, blocks of Styrofoam, ropes and boots.

Hiking Shi Shi

Sea stacks rise from the Pacific Ocean at the north end of Shi Shi Beach in Washington state’s Olympic National Park. One of the most pristine beaches in Washington state, Shi Shi provides blissful disconnect from rush of modern life.
A young boy riding a block of Styrofoam is pushed into the waves by a man at Shi Shi Beach. Debris from the tsunami in Japan in 2011 continues to wash up on the beach.
Point of Archers offers hikers and campers great spots to explore sea creatures during low tide.
Shi Shi (pronounced shy shy) was one of the last additions to Olympic National Park in 1976.
A plastic drum sits ashore at Shi Shi Beach in Washington state’s Olympic National Park. Despite it’s relative isolation, Shi Shi is sprinkled with debris washed up by ocean currents – including drums, blocks of Styrofoam, ropes and boots.
If you go

SHI SHI BEACH: 8.5 miles south of Neah Bay, Wash., about 4.5 hours northwest of Seattle; www.nps.gov/olym/planyourvisit/shi-shi-beach-olympic-wilderness.htm.
GETTING THERE: Shi Shi beach is reached via Highway 112, which snakes along Washington’s northwest border on the Olympic Peninsula and the Strait of Juan De Fuca across from Canada. Visitors must drive through the Makah Indian Reservation to get to Shi Shi and overnight parking is only available at private lots on the reservation for about $10. Visitors must also purchase a pass from the tribe, $10 per vehicle, available at several locations in Neah Bay, including the reservation museum and minimart. A $5 per person National Parks pass must also be purchased, and for overnight stays, posted on tents.
BEAR CANISTERS: These portable, animal-resistant food storage containers can be borrowed from the park’s Wilderness Information Center and some ranger stations, with a suggested $3 donation, or purchased at stores that sell camping supplies.

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