Stepping up for Uganda

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Stepping up for Uganda

Worlds apart, 2 towns connected at heart
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Stepping up for Uganda

Teddy Nakyejwe, left, and Anet Andikuru, are part of a widows group in Katosi, Uganda, that makes and sells crafts. The group received seed money for craft-making from Durango couple Sally and Rich Olsen.
Teachers at St. John Bosco School in Katosi, Uganda, hand out soccer jerseys to students. Durango Youth Soccer Association donated more than 100 jerseys and some shorts to students at the school. Herald News Editor Amy Maestas delivered the jerseys last month when she visited Uganda to work as a mentor to foreign journalists.
A widows group in Katosi, Uganda, makes beaded bracelets to sell for profit. The women, most of whom had husbands who died of AIDS, received seed money for their crafts from Durango resident Sally Olsen. The group is learning crafts to sell to financially support themselves. Though they lack a strong market to sell the jewelry, they have made enough to have their own internal microloan program.
St. John Bosco School students proudly play in soccer jerseys donated by Durango Youth Soccer Association. The school hopes to start a soccer team soon. The old DYSA jerseys will help the team have a unified look, even if they say “Durango” on them.
St. John Bosco School in Katosi, Uganda, was built in 2010. The Sekalalas, a Ugandan family, donated the land and paid for much of the cost to build it. A lot of the funding also came from money raised at events held by Step Up Uganda in Durango. The school currently has 238 students.
Step Up Uganda Field Coordinator Tony Kabuye shows patterns that sewing students use. The patterns are made from used flour bags.
At least half of the students at St. John Bosco School in Katosi, Uganda, are orphans. Most of their parents died from HIV/AIDS, and many are being raised by family members. Others are children of single mothers, who are AIDS widows.
The bathrooms at St. John Bosco School in Katosi, Uganda, double as a teachable opportunity. Plumbing is relatively new to most places in this small fishing village on Lake Victoria.
A sewing school set up in Katosi, Uganda, by Durango-based charity organization Step Up Uganda, helps women in their 20s learn to sew. Some Durango residents have sponsored sewing students by donating money each month. If the students successfully complete the program, they get a sewing machine when they graduate.
A widows group in Katosi, Uganda, makes necklaces from paper to sell for profit. The women, most of whom had husbands who died of AIDS, received seed money for their crafts from Durango resident Sally Olsen. The group is learning crafts to sell to financially support themselves. Though they lack a strong market to sell the jewelry, they have made enough to have their own internal microloan program.
A widows group in Katosi, Uganda, that was formed with the help of Durango-based organization Step Up Uganda learns business skills to be financially self-sufficient. Spokeswoman Joyce Najuma explains that the group is considering additional ways to make money. Many of the women in the widows group are mothers of students at St. John Bosco Primary School.
Students at St. John Bosco School in Katosi, Uganda, show off jerseys donated to them by Durango Youth Soccer Association.
School kids at St. John Bosco Primary School in Katosi, Uganda are happy to be wearing new-to-them soccer jerseys donated by Durango Youth Soccer Association.
AMY MAESTAS/Durango Herald

Village children in Katosi, Uganda, go to St. John Bosco Primary School. The school was built largely with money raised in Durango by Step Up Uganda founder Kathy Darnell. Many of the students are orphans.
There are several handmade signs on walls at St. John Bosco Primary School in Katosi, Uganda, that teach students about dangers such as sexual abuse. It is a common problem in the country.
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