La Posada: An Arizona oasis

Southwest Life

La Posada: An Arizona oasis

Mary Colter’s ‘resting place’ is reborn
The extensive gardens at La Posada in Winslow, Ariz., were a key element of Mary Colter’s vision for the desert hotel.
The west wing at La Posada contains original historic lodging with rooms named after famous actors and actresses who stayed there. Today, 53 rooms are available for guests.
This aerial photo shows the sprawling hotel in winter without shade from its trees and formal gardens. Mary Colter’s dream was to make the desert bloom and she did.
Originally, La Posada had three dining rooms including this historic lunch room. During World War II as soldiers crossed the country on troop trains, more than 3,000 Spam sandwiches were served each day.
The original lobby had a newsstand, gift shops and plenty of comfortable furniture. One of Colter’s jack rabbit ashtrays sits beside the leather chair against the far wall. Because La Posada’s furnishings were auctioned in 1959, these ashtrays command high prices at antique stores today.
Mary Colter was the Southwest’s premiere female architect at the turn of the 20th century. La Posada was her 1930 masterpiece. She designed and purchased everything for the 72,000-square-foot railroad hotel in Winslow, Ariz.
Businessmen frequented La Posada because of its quality dining, excellent rooms and ample meeting space. These Westerners posed at the roadside entrance when Route 66 ran past the hotel.
La Posada owner Allan Affeldt’s careful restoration and preservation have paid off with 80 percent annual occupancy at the hotel, which has become a popular stop for families traveling between Phoenix and Santa Fe.
Master gardener Patrick Pynes is trying to re-create Mary Colter’s vision for her formal gardens with fruit trees, flowers and vegetables. The sunken garden pictured here includes a water fountain and pool made of petrified wood.
Co-owner Tina Mion has 3,000 square feet of exhibit space for her compelling modern paintings. She also created stunning stained glass pieces for the Turquoise Dining Room. This piece includes an inset of La Posada as viewed from the Santa Fe railroad tracks.

La Posada: An Arizona oasis

The extensive gardens at La Posada in Winslow, Ariz., were a key element of Mary Colter’s vision for the desert hotel.
The west wing at La Posada contains original historic lodging with rooms named after famous actors and actresses who stayed there. Today, 53 rooms are available for guests.
This aerial photo shows the sprawling hotel in winter without shade from its trees and formal gardens. Mary Colter’s dream was to make the desert bloom and she did.
Originally, La Posada had three dining rooms including this historic lunch room. During World War II as soldiers crossed the country on troop trains, more than 3,000 Spam sandwiches were served each day.
The original lobby had a newsstand, gift shops and plenty of comfortable furniture. One of Colter’s jack rabbit ashtrays sits beside the leather chair against the far wall. Because La Posada’s furnishings were auctioned in 1959, these ashtrays command high prices at antique stores today.
Mary Colter was the Southwest’s premiere female architect at the turn of the 20th century. La Posada was her 1930 masterpiece. She designed and purchased everything for the 72,000-square-foot railroad hotel in Winslow, Ariz.
Businessmen frequented La Posada because of its quality dining, excellent rooms and ample meeting space. These Westerners posed at the roadside entrance when Route 66 ran past the hotel.
La Posada owner Allan Affeldt’s careful restoration and preservation have paid off with 80 percent annual occupancy at the hotel, which has become a popular stop for families traveling between Phoenix and Santa Fe.
Master gardener Patrick Pynes is trying to re-create Mary Colter’s vision for her formal gardens with fruit trees, flowers and vegetables. The sunken garden pictured here includes a water fountain and pool made of petrified wood.
Co-owner Tina Mion has 3,000 square feet of exhibit space for her compelling modern paintings. She also created stunning stained glass pieces for the Turquoise Dining Room. This piece includes an inset of La Posada as viewed from the Santa Fe railroad tracks.
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