Hoodoo heaven

Southwest Life

Hoodoo heaven

Discover the mysterious nature of wilderness exploration at Bisti
Visitors to the Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness, 40 miles south of Farmington, can spend a day walking through an otherworldly landscape.Some rock outcroppings make perfect tables and chairs for lunch, while others seem to create miniature worlds at a hiker’s feet.
This artist’s drawing shows the Bisti T-rex, slightly smaller than his larger more famous carnivorous cousin, charging across the landscape, where hikers now traverse. More than 70 million years ago the Bisti Badlands was the Bisti beach.
Volunteer Paul Sealey with the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science discovered a new type of Tyrannosaurus rex in the Bisti wilderness. This is a holotype of the skull and jaw the dinosaur.
Andrew Gulliford studies the eroded rock outcroppings of the Bisti Badlands.
Petrified stumps exist in between rounded gray deposits that resemble sleeping elephants.
Among the bizarre rock outcroppings to be found in the Bisti Badlands are capped rocks of all shapes and sizes, which appear even stranger as the hiker gets closer.
Hoodoos and rock people appear on the horizon once hikers have walked an hour beyond the Bureau of Land Management parking area.
Overcast days can make Bisti hikes even more surreal, but also complicate finding the way out. In places, the Bisti resembles a sci-fi movie set without the aliens.
Stretching from U.S. Highway 371 east to U.S. Highway 550, the Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness, 40 miles south of Farmington, offers miles of quiet hiking for trekkers willing to be self-sufficient and to carry adequate water as none can be found.

Hoodoo heaven

Visitors to the Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness, 40 miles south of Farmington, can spend a day walking through an otherworldly landscape.Some rock outcroppings make perfect tables and chairs for lunch, while others seem to create miniature worlds at a hiker’s feet.
This artist’s drawing shows the Bisti T-rex, slightly smaller than his larger more famous carnivorous cousin, charging across the landscape, where hikers now traverse. More than 70 million years ago the Bisti Badlands was the Bisti beach.
Volunteer Paul Sealey with the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science discovered a new type of Tyrannosaurus rex in the Bisti wilderness. This is a holotype of the skull and jaw the dinosaur.
Andrew Gulliford studies the eroded rock outcroppings of the Bisti Badlands.
Petrified stumps exist in between rounded gray deposits that resemble sleeping elephants.
Among the bizarre rock outcroppings to be found in the Bisti Badlands are capped rocks of all shapes and sizes, which appear even stranger as the hiker gets closer.
Hoodoos and rock people appear on the horizon once hikers have walked an hour beyond the Bureau of Land Management parking area.
Overcast days can make Bisti hikes even more surreal, but also complicate finding the way out. In places, the Bisti resembles a sci-fi movie set without the aliens.
Stretching from U.S. Highway 371 east to U.S. Highway 550, the Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness, 40 miles south of Farmington, offers miles of quiet hiking for trekkers willing to be self-sufficient and to carry adequate water as none can be found.
Reader Comments