Remembering WWI

Southwest Life

Remembering WWI

Serenity – and beauty – emerge from Flanders Fields battlegrounds
There are 1,534 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated at the Messines Ridge Cemetery in Mesen, Belgium. Of those graves, 957 of the burials are unidentified. This year marks the centennial of the start of World War I.
Gravestones line the Tyne Cot Cemetery in Zonnebeke, Belgium, where 11,956 Commonwealth servicemen are buried.
The “Trenches of Death” in Diksmuide, Belgium, were held by Belgian forces for the entire four years of World War I.
“The Mourning Parents,” a sculpture by German artist Kathe Kollwitz, is installed at the Vladslo German Cemetery in Vladslo, Belgium. The cemetery contains the graves of more than 25,000 German soldiers. The artist’s son, Peter Kollwitz, who was 18 when he was killed in the war, is buried in a grave in front of the statue.

Remembering WWI

There are 1,534 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated at the Messines Ridge Cemetery in Mesen, Belgium. Of those graves, 957 of the burials are unidentified. This year marks the centennial of the start of World War I.
Gravestones line the Tyne Cot Cemetery in Zonnebeke, Belgium, where 11,956 Commonwealth servicemen are buried.
The “Trenches of Death” in Diksmuide, Belgium, were held by Belgian forces for the entire four years of World War I.
“The Mourning Parents,” a sculpture by German artist Kathe Kollwitz, is installed at the Vladslo German Cemetery in Vladslo, Belgium. The cemetery contains the graves of more than 25,000 German soldiers. The artist’s son, Peter Kollwitz, who was 18 when he was killed in the war, is buried in a grave in front of the statue.
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