Animas High to expand offerings

News

Animas High to expand offerings

Underclassmen will conduct more interdisciplinary projects
Animas High School students, Nyana Salazar, 14, left, and Ashley Carpenter, 14, demonstrate their Rube Goldberg machine that has 12 energy transfers. Rube Goldberg machines make a simple task more complex, in this case, based on a Life board game with the outcome of pouring Life cereal in December at AHS. In the upcoming school year, freshmen may see projects like this expanded to include math and humanities. Students in Brian Morgan’s ninth-grade physics class, Nyana is the daughter of Nancy and David Salazar, and Ashley is the daughter of Julie and Jamie Carpenter.
Woytek

Animas High to expand offerings

Animas High School students, Nyana Salazar, 14, left, and Ashley Carpenter, 14, demonstrate their Rube Goldberg machine that has 12 energy transfers. Rube Goldberg machines make a simple task more complex, in this case, based on a Life board game with the outcome of pouring Life cereal in December at AHS. In the upcoming school year, freshmen may see projects like this expanded to include math and humanities. Students in Brian Morgan’s ninth-grade physics class, Nyana is the daughter of Nancy and David Salazar, and Ashley is the daughter of Julie and Jamie Carpenter.
Woytek
If you go

Animas High School is hosting a screening of “Most Likely to Succeed,” a documentary about High Tech High, the model for AHS, at 6 p.m. Monday at the Animas City Theatre, 128 E. College Drive. Admission is free.

Reader Comments
click here to add your event
Area Events