‘Bridge to the past’

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‘Bridge to the past’

Durango’s buildings have rich histories
Walter Ambold and Thomas Mason ran a grocery store and meat market from the mid-1920s to the late-1930s in the Schneider Block, which now houses the Himalayan Kitchen.
Karma T. Bhotia, left, owner of the Himalayan Kitchen, and staff, from center, Ganesh Shrestha, Yasoda Shrestha and Wang Bhotia, stand in what once was the Palace Grocery in the Schneider Block. The Himalayan Kitchen, which has been in the building since 2006, is at least the sixth restaurant at that location.
When the Newman Block, pictured here in 1895, opened in 1892, it was considered one of the finest buildings in the Southwest. Its elevator, the only one between Denver and Phoenix, was a tourist attraction. At the time, Durango had a tram that traveled from downtown all the way to Animas City, which began at what now is 25th Street.
The modern-day Trolley passes by the Newman Building on Main Avenue on Tuesday.

‘Bridge to the past’

Walter Ambold and Thomas Mason ran a grocery store and meat market from the mid-1920s to the late-1930s in the Schneider Block, which now houses the Himalayan Kitchen.
Karma T. Bhotia, left, owner of the Himalayan Kitchen, and staff, from center, Ganesh Shrestha, Yasoda Shrestha and Wang Bhotia, stand in what once was the Palace Grocery in the Schneider Block. The Himalayan Kitchen, which has been in the building since 2006, is at least the sixth restaurant at that location.
When the Newman Block, pictured here in 1895, opened in 1892, it was considered one of the finest buildings in the Southwest. Its elevator, the only one between Denver and Phoenix, was a tourist attraction. At the time, Durango had a tram that traveled from downtown all the way to Animas City, which began at what now is 25th Street.
The modern-day Trolley passes by the Newman Building on Main Avenue on Tuesday.
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