Records fall on a tequila sunrise

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Records fall on a tequila sunrise

Spain’s Jornet, as if in a dream, sets the new Hardrock high
Kilian Jornet finished the 2014 Hardrock Hundred Endurance Run in a new record – 22 hours, 41 minutes and 33 seconds – and the 26-year-old from Sabadell, Spain, had plenty of energy to burn at the finish line. He said he really only was tired the final two kilometers of the 100-mile race.
Kilian Jornet started the Hardrock Hundred Endurance Run at 6 a.m. Friday in Silverton, and 22 hours, 41 minutes and 33 seconds later, he covered the 100 miles from Silverton to Telluride, Ouray, Lake City and back to the start/finish in Silverton in record time. He kissed the rock in front of race director Dale Garland.
Darcy Piceu, the defending two-time Hardrock Hundred Endurance Run champion, was framed three-time defending champion Saturday in Silverton after the Boulder resident covered the 100 miles through heat, lightning and rain in 29 hours, 49 minutes and 58 seconds.
Julien Chorier, the Frenchman who won the counterclockwise version of the Hardrock Hundred Endurance Run in 2011, finished runner-up on this year’s clockwise course, more than a hour-and-a-half behind the winner, new record-holder Kilian Jornet of Spain. “After (Handies Peak), I see Kilian at altitude; it was so easy how he can run,” Chorier said of Jornet.
100 reasons to love the Hardrock

SILVERTON - A stunning win by ultrarunning’s most dominant athlete left the Hardrock Hundred Endurance Run race committee basking in the success of a “phenomenal” running of the 21st edition of the century race.
When Spain’s Kilian Jornet kissed the rock at the finish line of the 100-mile race that ranges from Silverton to Lake City, Ouray and Telluride at an average elevation of 11,000 feet in a record time of 22 hours, 41 minutes, 33 seconds, he called it the last race he had on his wish list to finish.
It is a big statement from the man who owns the world records on Denali and the Matterhorn, not to mention his multiple world titles.
“Kilian gave a phenomenal effort,” said Hardrock 100 race director Dale Garland, who has guided the 100 all 21 years. “We knew whatever record came out of this event was going to be a solid record. If nobody beat Kyle Skaggs’ record (23:23) from 2008, it was going to be a true record because the level of competition here this year was the best ever. For Kilian to not only go under Kyle’s record but beat it by such a wide margin is phenomenal.
“It is special to have somebody of his talent.”
When Garland heard the praise Jornet had for the race, it furthered the satisfaction he has had since beginning the race 23 years ago. (The race has been canceled twice, once because of fire danger and once because of heavy snowpack.)
“It is a validation of what we’ve created and how we do things. For someone with the stature in our sport that Kilian has to say something like that, you bet as a director it makes me feel good,” Garland said. “People not only have the desire to come here, but then also they really appreciate what we do.”
With the average finishing time of the race typically nearly double the time Jornet posted, Garland was happy to report a mostly smooth race. On average, nearly 40 percent of the 140 competitiors do not finish within the 48-hour time limit. As of dusk Saturday night, race organizers said 35 people did not finish.
“We had one potential medical emergency, but it resolved itself,” said Garland, referencing Jason Koop’s hypothermic situation near the summit of Handies Peak late Friday night.
A storm cell hovered over Handies Peak, Grouse Gulch and Ouray around 8 p.m. Friday.
“For the most part, most of them were pretty smart,” Garland said.
jlivingston@durangoherald.com

Records fall on a tequila sunrise

Kilian Jornet finished the 2014 Hardrock Hundred Endurance Run in a new record – 22 hours, 41 minutes and 33 seconds – and the 26-year-old from Sabadell, Spain, had plenty of energy to burn at the finish line. He said he really only was tired the final two kilometers of the 100-mile race.
Kilian Jornet started the Hardrock Hundred Endurance Run at 6 a.m. Friday in Silverton, and 22 hours, 41 minutes and 33 seconds later, he covered the 100 miles from Silverton to Telluride, Ouray, Lake City and back to the start/finish in Silverton in record time. He kissed the rock in front of race director Dale Garland.
Darcy Piceu, the defending two-time Hardrock Hundred Endurance Run champion, was framed three-time defending champion Saturday in Silverton after the Boulder resident covered the 100 miles through heat, lightning and rain in 29 hours, 49 minutes and 58 seconds.
Julien Chorier, the Frenchman who won the counterclockwise version of the Hardrock Hundred Endurance Run in 2011, finished runner-up on this year’s clockwise course, more than a hour-and-a-half behind the winner, new record-holder Kilian Jornet of Spain. “After (Handies Peak), I see Kilian at altitude; it was so easy how he can run,” Chorier said of Jornet.
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