Culture clash in Moab

Southwest Life

Culture clash in Moab

Tourism vs. oil and gas: Lessons from the Green River
Delicate Arch, the iconic sandstone formation on Utah’s license plate, is a vital part of Arches National Park. The park continues to have encroaching oil-and-gas development on adjacent Bureau of Land Management lands.
Large sandstone battlements named The Patriarchs welcome visitors to Arches National Park. Visitation continues to spiral upward, but now a tourist economy must embrace an oil-and-gas economy thriving near Moab.
Canoes float past cliffs during the Green River’s spring runoff. This year, high water peaked at 20,000 cubic feet per second.
At decades-old uranium mines near Moab, artifacts include mining debris and even entire bulldozers, such as this Allis Chalmers rusting away along the river near the Hey Joe Mine.
Just as an energy boom for oil and gas begins to change the landscape around Moab, relics from the 1950s uranium boom can still be found, such as this pickup truck cab ventilated with bullet holes at the Hey Joe Mine.
Fremont and Ute Indians left petroglyphs and pictograms, including handprints, along the river corridor. River runners also leave handprints, but in adhering to “Leave No Trace” ethics, these will wash off.
Canoeing the Green River near Moab is one of the finest flat water stretches in the Intermountain West with plenty of scenery and few crowded camps. History can be found at a variety of sites including these abandoned cabin timbers in Anvil Bottom.

Culture clash in Moab

Delicate Arch, the iconic sandstone formation on Utah’s license plate, is a vital part of Arches National Park. The park continues to have encroaching oil-and-gas development on adjacent Bureau of Land Management lands.
Large sandstone battlements named The Patriarchs welcome visitors to Arches National Park. Visitation continues to spiral upward, but now a tourist economy must embrace an oil-and-gas economy thriving near Moab.
Canoes float past cliffs during the Green River’s spring runoff. This year, high water peaked at 20,000 cubic feet per second.
At decades-old uranium mines near Moab, artifacts include mining debris and even entire bulldozers, such as this Allis Chalmers rusting away along the river near the Hey Joe Mine.
Just as an energy boom for oil and gas begins to change the landscape around Moab, relics from the 1950s uranium boom can still be found, such as this pickup truck cab ventilated with bullet holes at the Hey Joe Mine.
Fremont and Ute Indians left petroglyphs and pictograms, including handprints, along the river corridor. River runners also leave handprints, but in adhering to “Leave No Trace” ethics, these will wash off.
Canoeing the Green River near Moab is one of the finest flat water stretches in the Intermountain West with plenty of scenery and few crowded camps. History can be found at a variety of sites including these abandoned cabin timbers in Anvil Bottom.
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