Pot growing grows up

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Pot growing grows up

Growers using safer methods, officials say
Because of the legalizing of marijuana Durango and La Plata County, residents can now grow for their own use. It has been safer than before because
Under Amendment 64, which legalized recreational marijuana use in Colorado, residents age 21 and older may grow up to six plants at home.

Pot growing grows up

Because of the legalizing of marijuana Durango and La Plata County, residents can now grow for their own use. It has been safer than before because
Under Amendment 64, which legalized recreational marijuana use in Colorado, residents age 21 and older may grow up to six plants at home.
Durango could get pot-testing laboratory

Durango soon may have Colorado’s first marijuana-testing laboratory outside the Front Range.
Two industry veterans, Luke Mason and Tyler D’Spain, recently submitted applications to the city of Durango and the Colorado Department of Revenue’s Marijuana Enforcement Division to start a lab in the Durango Tech Center.
Much of Colorado’s legal marijuana industry is centered around Denver, but that’s beginning to change.
Aurum Labs would add to the state’s four licensed and certified retail marijuana testing facilities. Two are in Denver, and one each is in Boulder and Wheat Ridge, according to a recent Marijuana Enforcement Division report.
Marijuana retailers and dispensaries are required to test their products for potency and purity. Manufacturers are being pushed to limit edibles to 10 milligrams of active THC per unit after some tragedies were linked to potent edibles. Most notably, a Wyoming college student jumped to his death from a Denver hotel balcony in March after eating THC-infused cookies.
In addition to potency, labs also test products for residual levels of solvents such as propane and butane, which are used to concentrate THC.
Mason said dispensaries in Durango, Pagosa Springs, Mancos and Telluride are interested in using the proposed local lab.
He said a local lab could offer faster turnaround times for Southwest Colorado retail shops and dispensaries.
“People don’t want to send money to Denver if they could keep it local,” he said.
Mason previously worked as a grower for a local dispensary. He also has a background in science, once managing a lab that tested energy-efficient light bulbs.
To allow for the lab, Mason and D’Spain had to persuade neighbors in the Tech Center to amend the center’s regulations regarding approved uses. With that done, the location – next to the Medical Horticultural Services dispensary in the 700 block of Tech Center Drive – needs approval from the Planning Commission and City Council.
As if to illustrate the dramatic changes in marijuana policy in only a few years, Aurum Labs’ proposed location is near offices used by the FBI and a regional anti-drug consortium.
“The Southwest Drug Task Force, they’re right behind us,” Mason said. “They don’t have any problems with it. They don’t care.”
cslothower@durangoherald.com

In this series

Sunday: Durango joins the crowd, allows retail marijuana to go forward.
Monday: Legal marijuana puts employers, workers in awkward position.
Today: Growing your own? Landlords can still say no.

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