Pompeii: Dead city lives in ruins, imaginations

Southwest Life

Pompeii: Dead city lives in ruins, imaginations

A plaster cast captures the horror of a victim of the volcanic eruption of Mount Vesuvius, which in A.D. 79 destroyed the ancient town of Pompeii, near modern-day Naples, Italy. The plaster injection process was devised by 19th-century archaeologist Giuseppi Fiorelli to create casts of bodies encased by volcanic ash.
A narrow street leads through the ruined town of Pompeii, which was buried by volcanic ash from the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79. The marks in the foreground are ruts caused by ancient cartwheels.
A fragment of an ancient temple can be seen in Pompeii, near modern-day Naples, Italy. About 2.5 million people visit the ruins each year.
The sun shines on ancient walls in Pompeii. Volcanic ash has preserved the ruins, but they have been damaged in modern times because of excavation, exposure to the elements and foot traffic from the 2.5 million tourists who visit each year.
Carved lion heads and paws decorate a distinctive table base in a Pompeii house. Glimpses of everyday life can be seen within the ruins.
Partially restored columns stand in the old forum of Pompeii.
Tourists walk past the remains of Pompeii’s forum. An estimated 2.5 million people visit the site each year.
Plaster casts show victims as they were overcome by the heat and toxic gases of the volcanic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79. The eruption destroyed Pompeii, which is near modern-day Naples, Italy. The victims were found in an orchard that came to be known as the Garden of the Fugitives, a reference to the doomed locals’ attempts to flee disaster.

Pompeii: Dead city lives in ruins, imaginations

A plaster cast captures the horror of a victim of the volcanic eruption of Mount Vesuvius, which in A.D. 79 destroyed the ancient town of Pompeii, near modern-day Naples, Italy. The plaster injection process was devised by 19th-century archaeologist Giuseppi Fiorelli to create casts of bodies encased by volcanic ash.
A narrow street leads through the ruined town of Pompeii, which was buried by volcanic ash from the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79. The marks in the foreground are ruts caused by ancient cartwheels.
A fragment of an ancient temple can be seen in Pompeii, near modern-day Naples, Italy. About 2.5 million people visit the ruins each year.
The sun shines on ancient walls in Pompeii. Volcanic ash has preserved the ruins, but they have been damaged in modern times because of excavation, exposure to the elements and foot traffic from the 2.5 million tourists who visit each year.
Carved lion heads and paws decorate a distinctive table base in a Pompeii house. Glimpses of everyday life can be seen within the ruins.
Partially restored columns stand in the old forum of Pompeii.
Tourists walk past the remains of Pompeii’s forum. An estimated 2.5 million people visit the site each year.
Plaster casts show victims as they were overcome by the heat and toxic gases of the volcanic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79. The eruption destroyed Pompeii, which is near modern-day Naples, Italy. The victims were found in an orchard that came to be known as the Garden of the Fugitives, a reference to the doomed locals’ attempts to flee disaster.
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