Reviving a forest

Reviving a forest

234,000 Engelmann spruce seedlings replace losses in 2002 fire
Tree planters must negotiate steep slopes and uneven terrain while carrying bags of young trees and planting tools called hoe-dads. This contract crew planted several hundred acres in a burned spruce stand on Missionary Ridge.
Year-old Engelmann spruce seedlings await planting on Missionary Ridge. The little trees were grown at the U.S. Forest Service’s Bessey Nursery in Nebraska from native seeds collected as cones on the San Juan National Forest.
Bryce Frank, a seasonal San Juan National Forest employee, installs a stake row, which will help foresters locate and identify the recently replanted areas in coming years. Monitoring plantation survival is an integral part of a successful reforestation project.
A crew of contracted tree planters begins work at dawn high on Missionary Ridge. The Forest Service hopes their efforts will result in forests for the future in the former burned area of the Missionary Ridge Fire.

Reviving a forest

Tree planters must negotiate steep slopes and uneven terrain while carrying bags of young trees and planting tools called hoe-dads. This contract crew planted several hundred acres in a burned spruce stand on Missionary Ridge.
Year-old Engelmann spruce seedlings await planting on Missionary Ridge. The little trees were grown at the U.S. Forest Service’s Bessey Nursery in Nebraska from native seeds collected as cones on the San Juan National Forest.
Bryce Frank, a seasonal San Juan National Forest employee, installs a stake row, which will help foresters locate and identify the recently replanted areas in coming years. Monitoring plantation survival is an integral part of a successful reforestation project.
A crew of contracted tree planters begins work at dawn high on Missionary Ridge. The Forest Service hopes their efforts will result in forests for the future in the former burned area of the Missionary Ridge Fire.
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