An epidemic bugs the forest

News

An epidemic bugs the forest

Infestation of bark beetle demands immediate action
Stands of beetle-killed Engelmann spruce fill the mountainside on Wolf Creek Pass. The problem is expected to continue to spread, and San Juan Forest Service officials are working on a comprehensive strategy to address spruce bark beetles.
Spruce bark beetles live and feed underneath the tree’s bark in the phloem layer. A forest with a variety of types of trees and with different levels of maturity can help make the forest more resilient.
Wolf Creek Pass is one of the most highly visible areas of spruce bark beetle-killed trees. There also are infested areas north of Vallecito Reservoir.

An epidemic bugs the forest

Stands of beetle-killed Engelmann spruce fill the mountainside on Wolf Creek Pass. The problem is expected to continue to spread, and San Juan Forest Service officials are working on a comprehensive strategy to address spruce bark beetles.
Spruce bark beetles live and feed underneath the tree’s bark in the phloem layer. A forest with a variety of types of trees and with different levels of maturity can help make the forest more resilient.
Wolf Creek Pass is one of the most highly visible areas of spruce bark beetle-killed trees. There also are infested areas north of Vallecito Reservoir.
Reader Comments
click here to add your event
Area Events