Ghosts of the Southwest

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Ghosts of the Southwest

Abandoned mining towns exert irresistible pull
Bodie, Calif.,, seen in 1959, is one of the most famous ghost towns in the United States. Near the Nevada state line east of California’s Yosemite National Park, Bodie boomed during the Gold Rush days, with an estimated 10,000 residents in 1880, more than 60 saloons and a red-light district.
Bodie, Calif., is seen in 1959 from the top of Standard Hill. Today, the former mining town’s 100-or-so buildings are maintained by the California parks system, which protects the town in “an arrested state of decay,” keeping the buildings standing but making few other alterations.
Established in 1905, Rhyolite, Nev., is a ghost town northeast of Death Valley National Park. It’s now one of the most photogenic ghost towns of the Southwest because of the decrepit buildings and rocky landscape.
Rhyolite, Nev., quickly boomed during the Gold Rush and fell apart after the mine closed in 1911. It’s now one of the most photogenic ghost towns of the Southwest because of the abandoned buildings and rocky landscape.
The Amargosa Opera House is the highlight of Death Valley Junction, Calif., a town near the eastern entrance of Death Valley National Park. The town once thrived while a local borax mine and railroad were in operation.
Patrons wait for the doors to open at the Amargosa Opera House in Death Valley Junction, Calif. By the late 1920s, the town was little more than a tourist stop on the way to the park. Today, most of the buildings are gone but the town remains a draw because of a hotel and the restored opera house.
Goldfield, Ariz., boomed when gold was discovered in the 1890s but was abandoned in the 1920s. Today, the town offers numerous tours, attractions and activities for visitors.

Ghosts of the Southwest

Bodie, Calif.,, seen in 1959, is one of the most famous ghost towns in the United States. Near the Nevada state line east of California’s Yosemite National Park, Bodie boomed during the Gold Rush days, with an estimated 10,000 residents in 1880, more than 60 saloons and a red-light district.
Bodie, Calif., is seen in 1959 from the top of Standard Hill. Today, the former mining town’s 100-or-so buildings are maintained by the California parks system, which protects the town in “an arrested state of decay,” keeping the buildings standing but making few other alterations.
Established in 1905, Rhyolite, Nev., is a ghost town northeast of Death Valley National Park. It’s now one of the most photogenic ghost towns of the Southwest because of the decrepit buildings and rocky landscape.
Rhyolite, Nev., quickly boomed during the Gold Rush and fell apart after the mine closed in 1911. It’s now one of the most photogenic ghost towns of the Southwest because of the abandoned buildings and rocky landscape.
The Amargosa Opera House is the highlight of Death Valley Junction, Calif., a town near the eastern entrance of Death Valley National Park. The town once thrived while a local borax mine and railroad were in operation.
Patrons wait for the doors to open at the Amargosa Opera House in Death Valley Junction, Calif. By the late 1920s, the town was little more than a tourist stop on the way to the park. Today, most of the buildings are gone but the town remains a draw because of a hotel and the restored opera house.
Goldfield, Ariz., boomed when gold was discovered in the 1890s but was abandoned in the 1920s. Today, the town offers numerous tours, attractions and activities for visitors.
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