Some like it hot: Soaking at New Mexico's Ojo Caliente

Southwest Life

Some like it hot: Soaking at New Mexico's Ojo Caliente

A guest enjoys one of the larger mineral pools at Ojo Caliente where signs urge visitors to “Please whisper.”
Santa Fe chef and artist Ricardo Gutierrez enjoys the Iron Pool with its hot waters and high mineral content.
Adjacent to Bureau of Land Management Land to the west, Ojo Caliente offers hikers access to numerous trails into a high desert landscape once used by ancient Tewa people. This is a view from the Posi Trail maintained by the New Mexico Conservation Corps and the Rocky Mountain Youth Corps.
Built in 1924, the round adobe barn at Ojo Caliente is an artifact from the resort’s dairy operation, which thrived in the 1920s. The adobe barn is modeled after a Shaker community barn in Massachusetts. It’s the only such barn in New Mexico, and one of very few round barns in the U.S.
A distinctive feature of the Ojo Caliente Mineral Hot Springs Resort is the 1916 historic hotel and restaurant with its stuccoed exterior and interior rooms with original transoms above the doors for summer ventilation.
Built in 1868 by Antonio Joseph, the New Mexico territory’s first congressman, the original bathhouse is now surrounded by open pools of varying sizes, temperatures and mineral content.
Historic lodging at the Ojo Caliente Mineral Springs Resort included small cabins and duplex units for guests who wanted to “take the waters” for extended periods of time.
The deep set windows of the original 1868 bathhouse show the thickness of the building’s adobe walls.
A distinctive feature of the Ojo Caliente Mineral Hot Springs Resort is the 1916 historic hotel and restaurant with its stuccoed exterior and interior rooms with original transoms above the doors for summer ventilation.
The barn’s interior, carefully restored in 2002, demonstrates the immense woodwork and beam system necessary to support the heavy adobe walls. The round barn is now used for weddings and dances.
High school teacher and part-time Ojo Caliente security guard Victor Jaramillo says nearby families appreciate job opportunities at the resort and that the current owner “is a really good guy to work for. He’s trying to do outreach programs and internships for local high school students.”
A distinctive feature of the Ojo Caliente Mineral Hot Springs Resort is the 1916 historic hotel and restaurant with its stuccoed exterior and interior rooms with original transoms above the doors for summer ventilation.

Some like it hot: Soaking at New Mexico's Ojo Caliente

A guest enjoys one of the larger mineral pools at Ojo Caliente where signs urge visitors to “Please whisper.”
Santa Fe chef and artist Ricardo Gutierrez enjoys the Iron Pool with its hot waters and high mineral content.
Adjacent to Bureau of Land Management Land to the west, Ojo Caliente offers hikers access to numerous trails into a high desert landscape once used by ancient Tewa people. This is a view from the Posi Trail maintained by the New Mexico Conservation Corps and the Rocky Mountain Youth Corps.
Built in 1924, the round adobe barn at Ojo Caliente is an artifact from the resort’s dairy operation, which thrived in the 1920s. The adobe barn is modeled after a Shaker community barn in Massachusetts. It’s the only such barn in New Mexico, and one of very few round barns in the U.S.
A distinctive feature of the Ojo Caliente Mineral Hot Springs Resort is the 1916 historic hotel and restaurant with its stuccoed exterior and interior rooms with original transoms above the doors for summer ventilation.
Built in 1868 by Antonio Joseph, the New Mexico territory’s first congressman, the original bathhouse is now surrounded by open pools of varying sizes, temperatures and mineral content.
Historic lodging at the Ojo Caliente Mineral Springs Resort included small cabins and duplex units for guests who wanted to “take the waters” for extended periods of time.
The deep set windows of the original 1868 bathhouse show the thickness of the building’s adobe walls.
A distinctive feature of the Ojo Caliente Mineral Hot Springs Resort is the 1916 historic hotel and restaurant with its stuccoed exterior and interior rooms with original transoms above the doors for summer ventilation.
The barn’s interior, carefully restored in 2002, demonstrates the immense woodwork and beam system necessary to support the heavy adobe walls. The round barn is now used for weddings and dances.
High school teacher and part-time Ojo Caliente security guard Victor Jaramillo says nearby families appreciate job opportunities at the resort and that the current owner “is a really good guy to work for. He’s trying to do outreach programs and internships for local high school students.”
A distinctive feature of the Ojo Caliente Mineral Hot Springs Resort is the 1916 historic hotel and restaurant with its stuccoed exterior and interior rooms with original transoms above the doors for summer ventilation.
Reader Comments
click here to add your event
Area Events
click here to add your event
Area Events