Ruling has little impact on Coloradans

News

Ruling has little impact on Coloradans

High court upholds health-care subsidy provision
Trent Seubert’s original sign says that 165,000 people would lose health-care coverage but after the Supreme Court ruled Thursday that nationwide tax subsidies under the Affordable Care Act could be preserved, someone covers his sign to change the meaning.
GOP vows to continue fight

WASHINGTON – Congressional Republicans acknowledged their options are limited in replacing the Affordable Care Act though they vowed that the U.S. Supreme Court decision upholding federal subsidies is not the end of their fight.
“You deal with the rules that you have,” said House Budget Chairman Tom Price of Georgia. “And now, the rules won’t let you do everything you wanted to do.”
Republican presidential candidates, some of whom serve in Congress, added their voices to calls to scrap the law, though they didn’t say how they’d do so.
It’s unclear whether Republicans will attempt to use a budget maneuver known as reconciliation, an option they have endorsed in the past, to quickly move changes to the law through Congress. House Speaker John Boehner said that no decision has been made on whether to use that procedure.
Boehner said the Republican “struggle” against the health-care law will continue. Yet he would not commit to any vote this year to replace the law, the use of reconciliation or even suggest how broadly the Republican effort to change the law might be.
“My point is there’s been no decision,” he said in a news conference Thursday after the court ruling.
Price, an orthopedic surgeon before being elected to Congress, said the House Republican conference will probably decide to use reconciliation to try to repeal the health insurance law. “I think that’s where the conference will be,” he said.
Rep. Paul Ryan, chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, had been working on a contingency plan in case the court ruled against the law. He said after the decision was announced that his committee “will continue its work to advance a patient-centered alternative to finally repeal and replace Obamacare.”
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, a Kentucky Republican, urged Democrats to work with Republicans to alter the law – which he called “a rolling disaster” – to mitigate what some Republicans say are adverse impacts on the American public.
McConnell has in the past raised the possibility that Republicans could use reconciliation to undo the law. His spokesman, Don Stewart, didn’t immediately comment on whether McConnell would pursue that approach now.
Reconciliation is a procedural shortcut that would limit the opposition congressional Democrats could wage. It allows legislation to advance through the Senate with 51 votes, instead of 60.
But attacking all of the health-care law’s regulations and parts through reconciliation would be complex. President Barack Obama said at the White House Thursday that the Affordable Care Act “is here to stay” and is providing health care to millions of Americans.

Ruling has little impact on Coloradans

Trent Seubert’s original sign says that 165,000 people would lose health-care coverage but after the Supreme Court ruled Thursday that nationwide tax subsidies under the Affordable Care Act could be preserved, someone covers his sign to change the meaning.
Reader Comments
click here to add your event
Durango ~ Events
click here to add your event
Durango ~ Events