What went wrong?

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What went wrong?

A look at why the Environmental Protection Agency delayed notification after the Gold King Mine spill
The Gold King Mine blowout took place at 10:51 a.m. Aug. 5. This photo was taken five minutes later as orange mine waste gushed out of the opening.
About noon San Juan County Sheriff Bruce Conrad spots orange plume heading down Cement Creek. The plume reaches Silverton about an hour later.
Rayna Willhite of Aztec holds a bottle of water collected on the morning of Aug. 6 from the Animas River near Bakers Bridge.
Mine waste from the Gold King Mine filled the Animas River early Aug. 6 at Bakers Bridge.
Residents gathered on the evening of Aug. 6 at the 32nd Street Bridge in Durango to see the orange plume as it reached town limits.
Rancher Norman Jim Sr. has water delivered Aug. 12 to his ranch along the San Juan River on the Navajo Reservation in Shiprock. New Mexico and the Navajo Nation were not formally notified of the spill until 24 hours after the blowout.

What went wrong?

The Gold King Mine blowout took place at 10:51 a.m. Aug. 5. This photo was taken five minutes later as orange mine waste gushed out of the opening.
About noon San Juan County Sheriff Bruce Conrad spots orange plume heading down Cement Creek. The plume reaches Silverton about an hour later.
Rayna Willhite of Aztec holds a bottle of water collected on the morning of Aug. 6 from the Animas River near Bakers Bridge.
Mine waste from the Gold King Mine filled the Animas River early Aug. 6 at Bakers Bridge.
Residents gathered on the evening of Aug. 6 at the 32nd Street Bridge in Durango to see the orange plume as it reached town limits.
Rancher Norman Jim Sr. has water delivered Aug. 12 to his ranch along the San Juan River on the Navajo Reservation in Shiprock. New Mexico and the Navajo Nation were not formally notified of the spill until 24 hours after the blowout.
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Durango ~ Events
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