19th-century fur trapper Denis Julien traveled against the current

Southwest Life

19th-century fur trapper Denis Julien traveled against the current

ABOVE: This rock art inscription in Hell Roaring Canyon by Denis Julien explains how he traveled upstream solo on the Green River. The first Euro-American to leave a record of his travels in Grand County, Utah, Julien paddled a French flat-bottomed boat or pirogue. Wider than a modern day canoe, Julien’s boat had a mast and sail to use afternoon upriver winds. TOP: The inscription of Julien’s boat and sail.
This rock art inscription in Hell Roaring Canyon by Denis Julien explains how he traveled upstream solo on the Green River. The first Euro-American to leave a record of his travels in Grand County, Utah, Julien paddled a French flat-bottomed boat or pirogue. Wider than a modern day canoe, Julien’s boat had a mast and sail to use afternoon upriver winds.
This is the view up Hell Roaring Canyon at the jumble of rocks and talus where Denis Julien carved his name, the date and a drawing of his boat.
On a Centennial Canoe Outfitters trip in 2014, sponsored by Durango’s San Juan Mountains Association, Reilly and Elizabeth Barry got a view of Denis Julien’s inscription on the Colorado Plateau. Julien carved it where Hell Roaring Canyon intersects the lower Green River.
A French Canadian courer de bois, or fur trapper, uses his Hudson’s Bay wool blanket as a sail in his canoe. In the 19th-century, Denis Julien traveled up the Green River in a boat similar to this one.
Canoeing the lower Green River in Utah from Geyser Spring to Mineral Bottom represents one of the longest stretches of canoeable wilderness on the Colorado Plateau. Modern explorers canoe in teams down river. Denis Julien paddled and sailed solo upriver against the current.
A view of the upper Green River in Dinosaur National Monument shows the rugged terrain traversed by Denis Julien as he traveled upstream.
Fur trapper Denis Julien left his initials and the date, 1838, in Whirlpool Canyon three decades before John Wesley Powell came down the upper Green River and named the canyon during his famous 1869 expedition.
Fur trapper Denis Julien left his initials and the date, 1838, in Whirlpool Canyon three decades before John Wesley Powell came down the upper Green River and named the canyon during his famous 1869 expedition.
The jumble or rocks and canyon talus in Labyrinth Canyon explain why Denis Julien and other fur trappers used western waterways.

19th-century fur trapper Denis Julien traveled against the current

ABOVE: This rock art inscription in Hell Roaring Canyon by Denis Julien explains how he traveled upstream solo on the Green River. The first Euro-American to leave a record of his travels in Grand County, Utah, Julien paddled a French flat-bottomed boat or pirogue. Wider than a modern day canoe, Julien’s boat had a mast and sail to use afternoon upriver winds. TOP: The inscription of Julien’s boat and sail.
This rock art inscription in Hell Roaring Canyon by Denis Julien explains how he traveled upstream solo on the Green River. The first Euro-American to leave a record of his travels in Grand County, Utah, Julien paddled a French flat-bottomed boat or pirogue. Wider than a modern day canoe, Julien’s boat had a mast and sail to use afternoon upriver winds.
This is the view up Hell Roaring Canyon at the jumble of rocks and talus where Denis Julien carved his name, the date and a drawing of his boat.
On a Centennial Canoe Outfitters trip in 2014, sponsored by Durango’s San Juan Mountains Association, Reilly and Elizabeth Barry got a view of Denis Julien’s inscription on the Colorado Plateau. Julien carved it where Hell Roaring Canyon intersects the lower Green River.
A French Canadian courer de bois, or fur trapper, uses his Hudson’s Bay wool blanket as a sail in his canoe. In the 19th-century, Denis Julien traveled up the Green River in a boat similar to this one.
Canoeing the lower Green River in Utah from Geyser Spring to Mineral Bottom represents one of the longest stretches of canoeable wilderness on the Colorado Plateau. Modern explorers canoe in teams down river. Denis Julien paddled and sailed solo upriver against the current.
A view of the upper Green River in Dinosaur National Monument shows the rugged terrain traversed by Denis Julien as he traveled upstream.
Fur trapper Denis Julien left his initials and the date, 1838, in Whirlpool Canyon three decades before John Wesley Powell came down the upper Green River and named the canyon during his famous 1869 expedition.
Fur trapper Denis Julien left his initials and the date, 1838, in Whirlpool Canyon three decades before John Wesley Powell came down the upper Green River and named the canyon during his famous 1869 expedition.
The jumble or rocks and canyon talus in Labyrinth Canyon explain why Denis Julien and other fur trappers used western waterways.
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