Lifelong Durango friends head to Lesvos to help Syrian refugees

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Lifelong Durango friends head to Lesvos to help Syrian refugees

DHS graduates Julie Nass and Jenna Mulligan leave Jan. 13
Julia Nass, left, and Jenna Mulligan look over items they are packing to take to the Greek island Lesvos, where they will help aid refugees for about a month.
Julia Nass, left, and Jenna Mulligan write thank-you notes to people who have helped fund their trip to Lesvos, where they will help aid refugees for about a month. “This felt like something I could do, given the skills and experience I have right now,” Nass says about her trip to help the migrants.
A woman removes a baby’s life vest shortly after crossing the Aegean Sea on a dinghy with other refugees and migrants. The refugees had traveled from Turkey to the Greek island of Lesvos on Christmas Day. The International Organization for Migrants said more than 1 million people have entered Europe in 2014. Almost all came by sea, while 3,692 drowned in the attempt.
A Syrian child sleeps in his father’s arms while waiting to board a bus, after arriving on a dinghy from the Turkish coast to the northeastern Greek island of Lesvos. Bold ideas for helping Syrian refugees and their overburdened Middle Eastern host countries are gaining traction among international donors who were shocked into action by this year’s migration of hundreds of thousands of desperate Syrians to Europe.

Lifelong Durango friends head to Lesvos to help Syrian refugees

Julia Nass, left, and Jenna Mulligan look over items they are packing to take to the Greek island Lesvos, where they will help aid refugees for about a month.
Julia Nass, left, and Jenna Mulligan write thank-you notes to people who have helped fund their trip to Lesvos, where they will help aid refugees for about a month. “This felt like something I could do, given the skills and experience I have right now,” Nass says about her trip to help the migrants.
A woman removes a baby’s life vest shortly after crossing the Aegean Sea on a dinghy with other refugees and migrants. The refugees had traveled from Turkey to the Greek island of Lesvos on Christmas Day. The International Organization for Migrants said more than 1 million people have entered Europe in 2014. Almost all came by sea, while 3,692 drowned in the attempt.
A Syrian child sleeps in his father’s arms while waiting to board a bus, after arriving on a dinghy from the Turkish coast to the northeastern Greek island of Lesvos. Bold ideas for helping Syrian refugees and their overburdened Middle Eastern host countries are gaining traction among international donors who were shocked into action by this year’s migration of hundreds of thousands of desperate Syrians to Europe.
To donate

Julia Nass and Jenna Mulligan launched a crowdfunding page in an effort to raise $3,000 to cover personal expenses while in Lesvos. Thirty-six donors had given nearly $1,800, about 60 percent of their goal, by Thursday.
Nass read an article published in October on The Huffington Post website describing the calamitous plight of Syrians who migrated to the Grecian island. “I read those words and sent out a prayer for those in Lesvos,” Nass wrote on the crowdfunding page. “My prayer did not bring suffering people meals, dry clothing, first aid or shelter. I am over feeling like sending positive vibes are the most I can do.”
To donate, visit www.generosity.com/volunteer-fundraising/life-in-lesbos-help-refugees. Nass and Mulligan will have access to the site during their time in Greece to provide updates.

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